Hari Maharjan Project (HMP) is a Nepalese band formed in Kathmandu, Nepal in 2008.

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Members Hari Maharjan: Guitar
Rizu Tuladhar: Bass Guitar
Daniel Rasailey: Drums

Hometown Kathmandu

Current Location Kathmandu

Contact Info

Website http://www.reverbnation.com/harihttp://www.facemeu.com/hari-maharjan

Booking Agent harimaharjanpro@gmail.com

Founding members include composer/guitarist Hari Maharjan, bass player Riju Tuladhar and drummer Daniel Rasaily. HMP has achieved wide popularity with its unique sound that blends together to create a fusion of Middle Eastern influences, Nepalese folk, rock and jazz styles. Understood and enjoyed by both a National and International audience, their melodic instrumental pieces are orchestrated and ornamented with both eastern and western influences. Their Debut album, ‘Kalakarmi’, was recored in 2009 and was released yesterday on April 3rd, 2010. Technically very sound, their music is especially appreciated by musicians of various backgrounds. The band regularly has live performances in Nepal and has previously peformed with various local and renowned musicans such as Grammy winner Bishwa Mohan Bhatta, Chinese musical maestro Bian Liunian (Choreographer for the Beijing Olympics), French Guitarist Daniel Givone and Grammy winner Ozomattli (US based). The band feels that all these experiences have helped improve their skills both individually as musicians and have influenced their musical work together.

HMP have dedicated their music towards hope for the ongoing peace process and political stability of Nepal.

Source: Facebook.com

Bikash Shrestha Nepali Singer

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First Newari Rapper Bikash Shrestha
In music history of Nepal Bikash shrestha is one of the greatest acheivment . He is song writer, song composer and one of the top singer of Nepal. He had already past more than half of life in music. He star playing guitar when he was 14th. This guy is really music loving guy, he said that without music his life is nothing.
After starting music bikash starts to write song and also starts to compose. When friends and relative people force for album then he released his debut album i.e. Spriha at 2060 B.S. , this album contents 8 songs one of the most popular song of this album is “Gaath chaina bhaney”. This song is Nepal’s first hardrock rap video in Nepal. The album “sprisha” content 3 Newari song “syanabi” “Dan maru daya” and “Dhampa Thacha” so that this guy also know as firstNewa rapper also Nepal Bhasa rapper. Song name Dhampa thacha is also covered by the Lakhey band (Navras shrestha)
Bikash pour his feeling and he said that it really hard to write, compose and sing a song but in nepali it is more hard to released album. Althought there is lot of problem while releasing albums his respect with music , spriti and because of his fan’s love he continious released another 3 albums.
He had released “Parhkhibaseko chhu” in 2060. This album contents most of love song. He may fall in love at this duration. One of the most popular no. Of this album is Parhkhibaseko chhu which was directed by Prava Amatya. In this song you can see lots of beautiful models he added.
After grand sucess of Parhkhibaseko chhu he released another album i.e. Click at 2065 almost after 5 years then after long run he released his new album “Blaze”. This time original Bikash shrestha is came back. Bikash shretha came with is old style rock version one of the favorite no. is “Chahera”.
Rannko, hiv aids, choro bigryo, yatra and rest are also popular songs of Bikash shrestha. Song name Rannko is written by one of the great idol “Krishna Prashad Parajuli”. His song mostly arranged by Dipesh singh dongal top lead guitarist of Nepal “Lead guitarist of Robin n new revolution”.
Genre of this guy is Lok rock, Rap rock and slow rock. His almost song is composed in this gerne. So, our top singer and Newa rapper main goal is to create aware towards the country people and to develop the sense of Nepali original music blend with the international one.

Cradle of Filth

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Cradle of Filth are an English extreme metal band that formed in Suffolk in 1991. The band’s musical style evolved from black metal to a cleaner and more “produced” amalgam of gothic metal, symphonic black metal and other extreme metal styles. Their lyrical themes and imagery are heavily influenced by gothic literature, poetry, mythology and horror films.

The band has broken free from its original niche by courting mainstream publicity (often to the chagrin of its early fanbase), giving the band a “commercial” image. This increased accessibility has brought coverage from the likes of Kerrang! and MTV, along with frequent main stage appearances at major festivals such as Ozzfest, Download and even the mainstream Sziget Festival. They have sometimes been perceived as satanic by casual observers, even though their outright lyrical references to Satanism are few and far between; their use of satanic imagery has arguably always been more for shock value rather than any seriously held beliefs.

Early years (1991–1996)

Dani Filth in 2008

Cradle of Filth’s first three years saw three demos (Invoking the Unclean, Orgiastic Pleasures Foul and Total Fucking Darkness) recorded amidst the sort of rapid line-up fluctuations that have continued ever since, with the band having more than twenty musicians in its history. An album entitled Goetia was recorded prior to the third demo and set for release on Tombstone Records, but all tracks were wiped when Tombstone went out of business and could not afford to buy the recordings from the studio.[1] The band eventually signed to Cacophonous Records, and their debut album, The Principle of Evil Made Flesh, was Cacophonous’s first release in 1994. A step-up in terms of production from the rehearsal quality of most of their demos, the album was still nevertheless a sparse and embryonic version of what was to come, with lead singer Dani Filth’s vocals in particular bearing little similarity to the style he was later to develop. The album was well-received however,[2] and as recently as June 2006 found its way into Metal Hammer‘s list of the top ten black metal albums of the last twenty years.[3]

Cradle’s relationship with Cacophonous soon soured, the band accusing the label of contractual and financial mismanagement. Acrimonious legal proceedings took up most of 1995,[4] and the band finally signed to Music for Nations in 1996 after only one more contractually obligated Cacophonous recording: the EP V Empire or Dark Faerytales in Phallustein, which, it has since been conceded, was hastily written as a Cacophonous escape-plan.[4] Despite the circumstances of its release however, its handful of tracks are staples of the band’s live sets to this day, and “Queen of Winter, Throned” was listed among twenty-five “essential extreme metal anthems” in a 2006 issue of Kerrang! magazine.[5] The EP also marked Sarah Jezebel Deva’s debut with the band, replacing Andrea Meyer, Cradle’s first female vocalist and self-styled “satanic advisor”.[6] Deva appeared on every subsequent Cradle release and tour until 2010’s Darkly, Darkly, Venus Aversa, but was never considered a full band member, since she also performed with The Kovenant, Therion and Mortiis, and fronted her own Angtoria project along with Cradle’s former bass guitar player, Dave Pybus.

Music for Nations era (1996–2001)

Sarah Jezebel Deva joined the band in 1996

Dusk… and Her Embrace followed the same year: a critically acclaimed breakthrough album that greatly expanded the band’s fan-base throughout Europe and the rest of the world.[7] A concept album of sorts, based generally on vampirism and specifically (though loosely) on the writing of Sheridan Le Fanu,[citation needed] Cradle’s inaugural album for Music for Nations set the tone for what was to follow. The album’s production values matched the band’s ambition for the first time, whilst Dani’s vocal gymnastics were at their most extreme.

The increasingly theatrical stage shows of the 1997 European tour helped keep Cradle in the public eye, as did a burgeoning line of controversial merchandise, not least the notorious T-shirt depicting a masturbating nun on the front and the slogan “Jesus is a cunt” in large letters on the back. The T-shirt is banned in New Zealand,[8] a handful of fans have faced court appearances and fines for wearing the shirt in public, and some band members themselves attracted a certain amount of hostile attention when they wore similar “I Love Satan” shirts to the Vatican.[9] Alex Mosson, the Lord Provost of Glasgow from 1999 to 2003, called the shirts (and by implication the band) “sick and offensive”. The band obviously approved, using the quote on the back cover of the 2005 DVD Peace Through Superior Firepower.

The infamous “Vestal Masturbation” T-shirt design

In 1998, Dani began his long-running “Dani’s Inferno” column for Metal Hammer, and the band appeared in the BBC documentary series Living with the Enemy (on tour with a fan and his disapproving mother and sister)[10] and released its third studio album, Cruelty and the Beast. A fully realised concept album based on the legend of the “Blood Countess” Elizabeth Báthory, the album boasted the casting coup of Ingrid Pitt providing guest narration as the Countess; a role she first played in Hammer Film Productions’ 1971 film Countess Dracula. The album led to Cradle’s US debut,[11] and Dani claimed it in 2003 as the Cradle album of which he was most proud, although he conceded dissatisfaction with its sound quality.[12]

Paul Allender, cof, cardle of flith

Paul Allender left the band late in 1994, but rejoined in 2000 for Midian

The following year the band continued primarily to tour, but did release its first music video, PanDaemonAeon, and an accompanying EP, From the Cradle to Enslave, featuring the music from the production. Replete with graphic nudity and gore, the video was directed by Alex Chandon, who would go on to produce further Cradle promo clips and DVD documentaries, as well as the full-length feature film Cradle of Fear.

The band released their fourth studio album on the Halloween of 2000. Midian was based around the Clive Barker novel Cabal and its subsequent film adaptation Nightbreed.[13] Like Cruelty and the Beast, Midian featured a guest narrator, this time Doug Bradley, who starred in Nightbreed but remains best known for playing Pinhead in the Hellraiser series. Bradley’s line “Oh, no tears please” from the song “Her Ghost in the Fog” is a quote of Pinhead’s from the first Hellraiser (“No tears, please. It’s a waste of good suffering…”),[14] and Bradley would reappear on later albums Nymphetamine, Thornography and Godspeed on the Devil’s Thunder. The video for “Her Ghost in the Fog” received heavy rotation on MTV2 and other metal channels, and the track also found its way onto the soundtrack of the werewolf movie Ginger Snaps (it would also feature, much later, in the video game Brütal Legend).

Sony interlude (2001–2004)

The longest-ever interim period between full-length Cradle albums was nevertheless a busy time for the band. Bitter Suites to Succubi was released on the band’s own Abracadaver label, and was a mixture of four new songs, re-recordings of three songs from The Principle of Evil Made Flesh, two instrumental tracks and a cover of The Sisters of Mercy’s “No Time to Cry”. Stylistically similar to Midian, the album is unique among Cradle albums in featuring exactly the same band members as its predecessor. Further stop-gap releases followed in the form of the “best of” package Lovecraft & Witch Hearts and the live album, Live Bait for the Dead. Finally, the band (principally Dani) also found time to appear in the horror film Cradle of Fear while they negotiated their first major-label signing with Sony Music.

Damnation and a Day arrived in 2003; Sony’s heavyweight funding underwriting Cradle’s undiminished ambition[15] by finally bringing a real orchestra into the studio (the 80-member Budapest Film Orchestra and Choir replacing the increasingly sophisticated synthesisers of previous albums) and thus marking the band’s belated gestation—for one album only—into full-blown symphonic metal. Damnation featured the band’s most complex compositions to date, outran its predecessors by a good twenty minutes and produced two more popular videos: the Jan Švankmajer-influenced Mannequin and Babalon A.D. (So Glad for the Madness), based on Pier Paolo Pasolini’s film Salò. Roughly half the album trod the conceptual territory of John Milton’s Paradise Lost—showing the events of the fall of man through the eyes of Lucifer[11]—while the remainder comprised stand-alone tracks such as the Nile tribute “Doberman Pharaoh”[12] and the aforementioned “Babalon A. D.”; a reference to Aleister Crowley. “Babalon A. D.” was the first DVD-only single to reach the UK’s top 40 charts, according to the Guinness Book of Records of British Hit Singles and Albums. Feeling that Sony’s enthusiasm quickly palled however, Cradle jumped ship to Roadrunner Records after barely a year.[16]

Move to Roadrunner (2004–2010)

2004’s Nymphetamine was the band’s first full album since The Principle of Evil Made Flesh to not be based around any sort of overarching concept (although references to the works of H. P. Lovecraft are made more than once). Cradle’s bass guitarist Dave Pybus described it as an “eclectic mix between the group’s Damnation and Cruelty albums with a renewed vigour for melody, songmanship [sic] and plain fucking weirdness.”[17] Nymphetamine debuted at No. 89 on the Billboard Top 200 chart, selling just under 14,000 copies,[18] and the band’s growing acceptance by the mainstream was confirmed when the album’s title track was nominated for a Grammy award.[19]

Thornography was released in October 2006. According to Dani Filth, the title “represents mankind’s obsession with sin and self… an addiction to self-punishment or something equally poisonous… a mania.”[20] On the subject of the album’s musical direction, Filth told Revolver magazine, “I’m not saying it’s ‘experimental’, but we’re definitely testing the limits of what we can do… A lot of the songs are really rhythmical—thrashy, almost—but they’re all also really catchy.”[21] A flurry of pre-release controversy saw Samuel Araya’s original cover artwork scrapped and replaced in May 2006, although numerous CD booklets had already been printed with the original image.[16] Thornography received a similar reception to Nymphetamine, garnering generally positive reviews, but raising a few eyebrows with the inclusion of a cover of Heaven 17’s “Temptation”[22][23][24] (featuring guest vocals from Dirty Harry), which was released as a digital single and accompanying video shortly before the album. Thornography entered the Billboard chart at No. 66, having sold nearly 13,000 copies.[25]

Long-term drummer Adrian Erlandsson departed the band in November 2006, with the intention of devoting his energies to his two side projects, Needleye and Nemhain. The official press release from Roadrunner saw Erlandsson state “I have enjoyed my time with Cradle but it is now time to move on. I feel I am going out on a high as Thornography is definitely our best album to date”.[26] He was replaced by Martin Škaroupka.

Drummer Martin Škaroupka replaced Adrian Erlandsson for Godspeed on the Devil’s Thunder

Work on the eighth studio album, released in October 2008 as Godspeed on the Devil’s Thunder, began early that year following a GWAR-supported tour which took place in Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Romania, Slovakia and North America.[27] Godspeed is a concept album based around the legend of Gilles de Rais, a 15th-century French nobleman who fought alongside Joan of Arc and accumulated great wealth before becoming a Satanist, sexual deviant and murderer.[28] Kerrang! preferred the album to the “relatively weak” Thornography, calling it “grandiose and epic”,[29] while Metal Hammer said it had “genuine narrative depth and emotional resonance”,[30] and Terrorizer called it “cohesive, consistent and convincing”.[31] It sold 11,000 copies in its week of release, entering the Billboard 200 at No. 48.[32]

Peaceville Records (2010–present)

Cradle of Filth performing live at Metaltown Festival in June 2011

Cradle’s relationship with Roadrunner came to an end in April 2010, with the announcement that the band’s next album would be released by the British independent label Peaceville Records, using Cradle’s own Abracadaver imprint.[33] Dani Filth cited “the artistic restrictions and mindless inhibitions imposed by a major label” as the band’s reason for going independent.[34] Early press releases named the new album All Hallows Eve,[35] but by August 2010 the title was confirmed as Darkly, Darkly, Venus Aversa.[34][36] Released on 1 November 2010, it is a concept album in the same vein as its predecessor, Godspeed on the Devil’s Thunder; this time centring on the demon Lilith, the first wife of the biblical Adam,[33] and also making reference to Greek, Egyptian and Sumerian mythology, the Knights Templar and the Carmelite Nuns. The label referred to it as “a dark tapestry of horror, madness and twisted sex”,[35] while Filth called its sound “creepily melodic, like Mercyful Fate or a dark Iron Maiden”.[37] Metal Hammer‘s Dom Lawson felt it was “another sumptuous and spectacular eruption of gothic melodrama, perverted sonic schlock and balls-out extreme metal bombast”, and likened it to an “instalment in an ongoing series of novels.”[38]

An EP entitled Evermore Darkly, featuring “new tracks and rarities”, was released in October 2011. The package included a DVD with a tour documentary, a live DVD recorded at 2011’s Graspop festival and the video for “Lilith Immaculate”.

In April 2012, the compilation album Midnight in the Labyrinth was released, featuring orchestral re-recordings of songs from the band’s first three albums and the V Empire EP.[39] Dani Filth had described it in the preceding months as “reinventing” the tracks as “full soundtrack quality stuff… with choirs, strings and some narration”.[40] This album’s version of “Summer Dying Fast” was included on Evermore Darkly as a teaser for the full release (the Evermore track listing subtitles this version “Midnight in the Labyrinth breadcrumb trail”), and “A Gothic Romance (Red Roses for the Devil’s Whore)” was released online via Peaceville’s website on 4 April. Sarah Jezebel Deva returned to provide female vocals for Midnight in the Labyrinth; her first work with Cradle since her departure in 2008.

In July 2012, the band re-issued its back catalogue from 1994 to 2002, via The End Records.[41]

Cradle’s tenth studio album, The Manticore and Other Horrors, was released on 29 October 2012 in Europe, and on 30 October in North America. Paul Allender told Ultimate Guitar that “The last thing we want to do is come out with another album that sounds like the last two. We decided to change direction and go back to what we used to do with the female vocals; all the strong melody lines and harmonies… I’ve put a lot of punk-orientated riffs back into it again. It’s really gone quite dark and pretty hardcore.”[42]

On September 2, 2013, via his monthly blog, Dani Filth announced the first ever Cradle of Filth comic book, entitled “Curse of Venus Aversa”, and “a career spanning double-disc ‘best of'” that is yet to be named.[43]

In March of 2014, Cradle of Filth announced the re-release of their controversial 1993 demo Total Fucking Darkness on May 5. The album will be released on CD and limited edition vinyl. It features all tracks from the original demo, as well as unreleased tracks.[44]

Musical style

Cradle of Filth’s particular subgenre has provoked a great deal of discussion,[45] and their status as a black metal band or otherwise has been in debate since near the time that the group rose to fame.[46] The band have openly mentioned classic ’80s black metal acts such as Bathory, Celtic Frost and Mercyful Fate among their influences, but Dani Filth, in a 1998 interview for BBC Radio 5 for example, said “I use the term ‘heavy metal’, rather than ‘black metal’, because I think that’s a bit of a fad now. Call it what you like: death metal, black metal, any kind of metal…”.[47] Gavin Baddeley’s 2006 Terrorizer interview states that “few folk, the band included, call Cradle black metal these days.”[48] In a 2006 interview with Terrorizer magazine, current guitarist Paul Allender said, “We were never a black metal band. The only thing that catered to that was the make-up. Even when The Principle of Evil Made Flesh came out—you look at Emperor and Burzum and all that stuff—we didn’t sound anything like that. The way that I see it is that we were, and still are now, an extreme metal band.”[49]

The band’s style has been described as symphonic black metal,[50] gothic metal,[51][52] “gothic black metal”[53] and even “dark metal”.[54] However, the band’s evolving sound has allowed them to continue resisting definitive categorisation. They are audibly influenced by Iron Maiden, have collaborated on projects like Christian Death’s Born Again Anti-Christian album (on the track “Peek-a-Boo”) and have even dabbled outside of metal music with dance remixes (such as “Twisting Further Nails” and “Pervert’s Church”), although these have fallen by the wayside in recent years.

Appearing on the BBC music quiz Never Mind the Buzzcocks on 9 April 2001, Filth jokingly claimed Cradle’s sound as “heavy funk”, and in an October 2006 interview stated, “we’d rather be known as solely ‘Cradle of Filth’, I think, than be hampered by stupid genre barriers.”[55]

Current band members

Main article: List of Cradle of Filth band members
  • Dani Filth – vocals
  • Paul Allender – guitar
  • Daniel Firth – bass
  • James McIlroy – guitar
  • Martin Skaroupka – drums
  • Lindsay Schoolcraft – live keys and female vocals

Discography

Main article: Cradle of Filth discography
Studio albums
  • The Principle of Evil Made Flesh (1994)
  • Dusk… and Her Embrace (1996)
  • Cruelty and the Beast (1998)
  • Midian (2000)
  • Damnation and a Day (2003)
  • Nymphetamine (2004)
  • Thornography (2006)
  • Godspeed on the Devil’s Thunder (2008)
  • Darkly, Darkly, Venus Aversa (2010)
  • The Manticore and Other Horrors (2012)

Iron Maiden

Iron Maiden, best metal band, metal legend, hard rock band
Top: Steve Harris (L), Dave Murray (R)
Middle: Adrian Smith (L), Bruce Dickinson (R)
Bottom: Nicko McBrain (L), Janick Gers (R)
Background information
Origin Leyton, London, England
Genres Heavy metal
Years active 1975–present
Labels EMI, Universal, Sanctuary, Columbia, Portrait, Epic, Capitol, Harvest
Associated acts The Entire Population of Hackney, Gogmagog, Praying Mantis, Psycho Motel, Samson, Trust, Urchin
Website www.ironmaiden.com
Members Steve Harris
Dave Murray
Adrian Smith
Bruce Dickinson
Nicko McBrain
Janick Gers
Past members Former members

Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band formed in Leyton, east London, in 1975 by bassist and primary songwriter Steve Harris. The band’s discography has grown to thirty-seven albums, including fifteen studio albums, eleven live albums, four EPs, and seven compilations.

Pioneers of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal, Iron Maiden achieved initial success during the early 1980s. After several line-up changes, the band went on to release a series of US and UK platinum and gold albums, including 1982’s The Number of the Beast, 1983’s Piece of Mind, 1984’s Powerslave, 1985’s live release Live After Death, 1986’s Somewhere in Time and 1988’s Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. Since the return of lead vocalist Bruce Dickinson and guitarist Adrian Smith in 1999, the band have undergone a resurgence in popularity,[1] with their latest studio offering, The Final Frontier, peaking at No. 1 in 28 different countries and receiving widespread critical acclaim.

Despite little radio or television support, Iron Maiden are considered one of the most successful heavy metal bands in history, with The New York Times reporting in 2010 that they have sold over 85 million records worldwide. The band won the Ivor Novello Award for international achievement in 2002. As of October 2013, the band have played over 2000 live shows throughout their career. For the past 35 years, the band have been supported by their famous mascot, “Eddie”, who has appeared on almost all of their album and single covers, as well as in their live shows.

Early years (1975–1978)

Iron Maiden were formed on Christmas Day 1975 by bassist Steve Harris shortly after he left his previous group, Smiler. Harris attributes the band’s name to a film adaptation of The Man in the Iron Mask from the novel by Alexandre Dumas, which he saw around that time and which had a verbal connection to the iron maiden torture device.After months of rehearsal, Iron Maiden made their debut at St. Nicks Hall in Poplar on 1 May 1976,before taking up a semi-residency at the Cart and Horses Pub in Maryland Point, Stratford. The original line-up did not last very long, however, with vocalist Paul Day being the first casualty as he lacked “energy or charisma onstage.” He was replaced by Dennis Wilcock, a Kiss fan who used make-up and fake blood during live performances. Wilcock’s friend Dave Murray was invited to join, to the dismay of the band’s guitarists Dave Sullivan and Terry Rance. Their frustration led Harris to temporarily disband Iron Maiden in 1976, though the group reformed soon after with Murray as the sole guitarist. Steve Harris and Dave Murray remain the band’s longest-standing members and have performed on all of their releases.

Iron Maiden recruited yet another guitarist in 1977, Bob Sawyer, who was sacked for embarrassing the band onstage by pretending to play guitar with his teeth.Tension ensued again, causing a rift between Murray and Wilcock, who convinced Harris to fire Murray,as well as original drummer Ron Matthews. A new line-up was put together, including future Cutting Crew member Tony Moore on keyboards, Terry Wapram on guitar, and drummer Barry Purkis. A bad performance at the Bridgehouse, a pub located in Canning Town, in November 1977 was the line-up’s first and only concert and led to Purkis being replaced by Doug Sampson.At the same time, Moore was asked to leave as Harris decided that keyboards did not suit the band’s sound.A few months later, Dennis Wilcock decided he’d had enough with the group and left to form his own band, V1, and Dave Murray was immediately reinstated. As he preferred to be the band’s sole guitarist, Wapram disapproved of Murray’s return and was also dismissed.
Steve Harris, Dave Murray and Doug Sampson spent the summer and autumn of 1978 rehearsing while they searched for a singer to complete the band’s new line-up.[15] A chance meeting at the Red Lion pub in Leytonstone in November 1978 evolved into a successful audition for vocalist Paul Di’Anno.[16] Steve Harris has stated, “There’s sort of a quality in Paul’s voice, a raspiness in his voice, or whatever you want to call it, that just gave it this great edge.”[17] At this time, Murray would typically act as their sole guitarist, with Harris commenting, “Davey was so good he could do a lot of it on his own. The plan was always to get a second guitarist in, but finding one that could match Davey was really difficult.”[18]
Rise to fame (1978–1981)
Main articles: The Soundhouse Tapes, Iron Maiden (album), and Killers (Iron Maiden album)

On New Year’s Eve 1978, Iron Maiden recorded a demo, consisting of four songs, at Spaceward Studios in Cambridge.[19] Hoping the recording would help them secure more gigs,[19] the band presented a copy to Neal Kay, then managing a heavy metal club called “Bandwagon Heavy Metal Soundhouse”, located in Kingsbury Circle, northwest London.[20] Upon hearing the tape, Kay began playing the demo regularly at the Bandwagon, and one of the songs, “Prowler”, eventually went to No. 1 in the Soundhouse charts, which were published weekly in Sounds magazine.[21] A copy was also acquired by Rod Smallwood, who soon became the band’s manager,[22] and, as Iron Maiden’s popularity increased, they decided to release the demo on their own record label as The Soundhouse Tapes, named after the club.[23] Featuring only three tracks (one song, “Strange World”, was excluded as the band were unsatisfied with its production)[24] all five thousand copies were sold out within weeks.[25]

In December 1979, the band secured a major record deal with EMI[26] and asked Dave Murray’s childhood friend Adrian Smith to join the group as their second guitarist.[27] Smith declined as he was busy with his own band, Urchin, so Iron Maiden hired guitarist Dennis Stratton instead.[28] Shortly afterwards, Doug Sampson left due to health issues and was replaced by an ex-Samson drummer Clive Burr at Stratton’s suggestion on 26 December.[29] Iron Maiden’s first appearance on an album was on the Metal for Muthas compilation (released on 15 February 1980) with two early versions of “Sanctuary” and “Wrathchild”.[30] The release led to an ensuing tour which featured several other bands linked with the New Wave of British Heavy Metal.[31]

Iron Maiden’s eponymous 1980 release, Iron Maiden, debuted at No. 4 in the UK Albums Chart.[32] In addition to the title track (a live version of which would be one of the first music videos aired on MTV),[33] the album includes other early favourites such as “Running Free”, “Transylvania”, “Phantom of the Opera”, and “Sanctuary” – which was not on the original UK release but made the US version and subsequent remasters. The band set out on a headline tour of the UK, before opening for Kiss on their 1980 Unmasked Tour’s European leg as well as supporting Judas Priest on select dates. After the Kiss tour, Dennis Stratton was dismissed from the band as a result of creative and personal differences,[34] and was replaced by Adrian Smith in October 1980.

In 1981, Iron Maiden released their second album, entitled Killers. Containing many tracks that had been written prior to their debut release, only two new songs were written for the record: “Prodigal Son” and “Murders in the Rue Morgue”[35] (the latter’s title was taken from the short story by Edgar Allan Poe).[36] Unsatisfied with the production on their debut album,[37] the band hired veteran producer Martin Birch,[38] who would go on to work for Iron Maiden until his retirement in 1992.[39] The record was followed by the band’s first world tour, which included their debut performance in the United States, opening for Judas Priest at The Aladdin Casino, Las Vegas.[40]

Success (1981–1986)
Main articles: The Number of the Beast (album), Piece of Mind, Powerslave, and Live After Death

By 1981, Paul Di’Anno was demonstrating increasingly self-destructive behaviour, particularly through his drug usage,[5] about which Di’Anno comments, “it wasn’t just that I was snorting a bit of coke, though; I was just going for it non-stop, 24 hours a day, every day… the band had commitments piling up that went on for months, years, and I just couldn’t see my way to the end of it. I knew I’d never last the whole tour. It was too much.”[41] With his performances suffering, Di’Anno was immediately dismissed following the Killer World Tour,[42] at which point the band had already selected his replacement.[43]

After a meeting with Rod Smallwood at the Reading Festival,[44] Bruce Dickinson, previously of Samson, auditioned for Iron Maiden in September 1981 and was immediately hired.[43] The following month, Dickinson went out on the road with the band on a small headlining tour in Italy, as well as a one-off show at the Rainbow Theatre in the UK.[42] In anticipation of their forthcoming album, the band played “Children of the Damned”, “Run to the Hills”, “22 Acacia Avenue”, and “The Prisoner” at select venues, introducing fans to the sound that they were progressing towards.

Dickinson’s record debut with Iron Maiden was 1982’s The Number of the Beast, an album that gave the band their first ever UK Albums Chart No. 1 record[45] and additionally became a Top Ten hit in many other countries.[46] At the time he was in the midst of legal difficulties with Samson’s management and was not permitted to add his name to any of the songwriting credits, although he still made what he described as a “moral contribution” to “Children of the Damned”, “The Prisoner” and “Run to the Hills”.[47] For the second time the band embarked on a world tour, dubbed The Beast on the Road, during which they visited North America, Japan, Australia and Europe, including a headline appearance at the Reading Festival. A new and hugely successful chapter in Iron Maiden’s future was cemented; in 2010 The New York Times reported that the album had sold over 14 million copies worldwide.[3]

The Beast on the Road’s US leg proved controversial when an American conservative political lobbying group claimed Iron Maiden were Satanic because of the new album’s title track,[46] to the point where a group of Christian activists destroyed Iron Maiden records as a protest against the band.[48] In recent years, Dickinson has stated that the band treated this as “silliness,”[49] and that the demonstrations in fact gave them “loads of publicity.”[5]

In December 1982, drummer Clive Burr was fired from the band and replaced by Nicko McBrain, previously of French band Trust.[50] Although Harris states that his dismissal took place because his live performances were affected by offstage activities,[51] Burr objected to this and claimed that he was unfairly ousted from the band.[52] Soon afterwards, the band journeyed for the first time to The Bahamas to record the first of three consecutive albums at Compass Point Studios.[53] In 1983, they released Piece of Mind, which reached the No. 3 spot in the UK,[54] and was the band’s debut at the North American charts, reaching No. 70 on the Billboard 200.[55] Piece of Mind includes the successful singles “The Trooper” and “Flight of Icarus”, the latter of which being particularly notable as one of the band’s few songs to gain substantial airplay in the US.[56]

Soon after the success of Piece of Mind and its supporting tour, the band released Powerslave on 9 September 1984. The album featured fan favourites “2 Minutes to Midnight”, “Aces High”, and “Rime of The Ancient Mariner”,[57] the latter based on Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem of the same name and running over 13 minutes long.

The tour following the album, dubbed the World Slavery Tour, was the band’s largest to date and consisted of 193 shows in 28 countries over 13 months,[57] playing to an estimated 3,500,000 people.[58] Many shows were played back-to-back in the same city, such as in Long Beach, California (4 consecutive sold out concerts to an overall audience of 54,000), where the majority of their subsequent live release, Live After Death, was recorded, which became a critical and commercial success, peaking at No. 4 in the UK.[59] Iron Maiden also co-headlined (with Queen) the Rock in Rio festival, where they performed to an estimated crowd of 300,000.[60] The tour was physically gruelling for the band, who demanded a six-month break when it ended (although this was later reduced to four months).[61] This was the first substantial break in the band’s history, including the cancellation of a proposed supporting tour for the new live album,[62] with Bruce Dickinson threatening to quit unless the tour ended.[63]
Experimentation (1986–1989)
Main articles: Somewhere in Time (Iron Maiden album) and Seventh Son of a Seventh Son

Returning from their time off, the band adopted a different style for their 1986 studio album, entitled Somewhere in Time, featuring, for the first time in the band’s history, synthesised bass and guitars to add textures and layers to the sound.[64] The release charted well across the world, particularly with the single “Wasted Years”, but notably included no writing credits from lead singer Bruce Dickinson, whose material was rejected by the rest of the band.[65] While Dickinson was focused on his own music, guitarist Adrian Smith, who typically collaborated with the vocalist, was “left to [his] own devices” and began writing songs on his own, coming up with “Wasted Years”, “Sea of Madness”, and “Stranger in a Strange Land”,[66] the last of which would be the album’s second single.[65]

The experimentation evident on Somewhere in Time continued on their next album, entitled Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, which was released in 1988. A concept album, based on the 1987 novel Seventh Son by Orson Scott Card,[67] this would be the band’s first record to include keyboards, as opposed to guitar synthesisers on the previous release.[68] After his contributions were not used for Somewhere in Time, Dickinson’s enthusiasm was renewed as his ideas were accepted for this album.[68] Another popular release, it became Iron Maiden’s second album to hit No. 1 in the UK charts,[69] although it only achieved a Gold certification in the US, in contrast to its four predecessors.[70]

During the following tour, the band headlined the Monsters of Rock festival at Donington Park for the first time on 20 August 1988, playing to the largest crowd in the festival’s history (107,000).[71] Also included on the bill were Kiss, David Lee Roth, Megadeth, Guns N’ Roses and Helloween.[72] The festival was marred, however, by the deaths of two fans in a crowd-surge during the aforementioned Guns N’ Roses performance; the following year’s festival was cancelled as a result.[71] The tour concluded with several headline shows in the UK in November and December 1988, with the concerts at the NEC Arena, Birmingham recorded for a live video, entitled Maiden England.[73]
Upheaval (1989–1994)
Main articles: No Prayer for the Dying and Fear of the Dark (Iron Maiden album)

During another break in 1989, guitarist Adrian Smith released a solo album with his band ASAP, entitled Silver and Gold,[74] and vocalist Bruce Dickinson began work on a solo album with former Gillan guitarist Janick Gers, releasing Tattooed Millionaire in 1990,[75] followed by a tour.[76] At the same time, to mark the band’s ten-year recording anniversary, Iron Maiden released The First Ten Years, a series of ten CDs and double 12″ vinyl. Between 24 February and 28 April 1990, the individual parts were released one-by-one, each containing two of Iron Maiden’s singles, including the original B-sides.

Soon afterwards, Iron Maiden regrouped to work on a new studio record. During the pre-production stages, Adrian Smith left the band due to differences with Steve Harris regarding the direction the band should be taking, disagreeing with the “stripped down” style that they were leaning towards.[77] Janick Gers, having worked on Dickinson’s solo project, was chosen to replace Smith and became the band’s first new member in seven years.[76] The album, No Prayer for the Dying, was released in October 1990[78] and contained “Bring Your Daughter… to the Slaughter”, the band’s first (and to date, only) UK Singles Chart No. 1, originally recorded by Dickinson for the soundtrack to A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child.[79]

After another tour and some more time off, the band recorded their next studio release, Fear of the Dark, which was released in 1992 and included the stand-out title track, which is now a regular fixture in the band’s concert setlists. Achieving their third No. 1 in the UK albums chart,[80] the disc also featured “Wasting Love”, one of the band’s softer songs, and the No. 2 single “Be Quick or Be Dead”. The album featured the first songwriting by Gers, and no collaboration at all between Harris and Dickinson on songs. The extensive worldwide tour that followed included their first ever Latin American leg (after a single concert during the World Slavery Tour), and headlining the Monsters of Rock festivals in seven European countries. Iron Maiden’s second performance at Donington Park, to an audience of 68,500 (the attendance was capped after the incident in 1988),[81] was filmed for the audio and video release, Live at Donington, and featured a guest appearance by Adrian Smith, who joined the band to perform “Running Free”.[81]

In 1993, Bruce Dickinson left the band to further pursue his solo career, but agreed to remain for a farewell tour and two live albums (later re-released in one package).[82] The first, A Real Live One, featured songs from 1986 to 1992, and was released in March 1993. The second, A Real Dead One, featured songs from 1980 to 1984, and was released after Dickinson had left the band. The tour did not go well, however, with Steve Harris claiming that Dickinson would only perform properly for high profile shows and that at several concerts he would only mumble into the microphone.[83] Dickinson denies the charge that he was under-performing, stating that it was impossible to “make like Mr Happy Face if the vibe wasn’t right,” claiming that news of his exit from the band had prevented any chance of a good atmosphere during the tour.[84] He played his farewell show with Iron Maiden on 28 August 1993, which was filmed, broadcast by the BBC and released on video under the name Raising Hell.[85]

While the group were considering a replacement for Bayley, Rod Smallwood convinced Steve Harris to invite Bruce Dickinson back into the band.[101] Although Harris admits that he “wasn’t really into it” at first, he then thought, “‘Well, if the change happens, who should we get?’ The thing is, we know Bruce and we know what he’s capable of, and you think, ‘Well, better the devil you know.’ I mean, we got on well professionally for, like, eleven years, and so… after I thought about it, I didn’t really have a problem with it.”[101]

The band entered into talks with Dickinson, who agreed to rejoin during a meeting in Brighton in January 1999,[102] along with guitarist Adrian Smith, who was telephoned a few hours later.[103] With Gers, Smith’s replacement, remaining, Iron Maiden now had a three-guitar line-up and embarked on a hugely successful reunion tour.[104] Dubbed The Ed Hunter Tour, it tied in with the band’s newly released greatest hits collection, Ed Hunter, whose track listing was decided by a poll on the group’s website, and also contained a computer game of the same name starring the band’s mascot.[105]

One of Dickinson’s primary concerns on rejoining the group “was whether we would in fact be making a real state-of-the-art record and not just a comeback album,”[101] which eventually took the form of 2000’s Brave New World.[106] Having disliked the results from Harris’ personal studio, Barnyard Studios located on his property in Essex,[107] which had been used for the last four Iron Maiden studio albums, the band recorded the new release at Guillaume Tell Studios, Paris in November 1999 with producer Kevin Shirley.[106] Thematic influences continued with “The Wicker Man” – based on the 1973 British cult film of the same name – and “Brave New World” – title taken from the Aldous Huxley novel of the same name.[108] The album furthered the more progressive and melodic sound present in some earlier recordings, with elaborate song structures and keyboard orchestration.[108]

The world tour that followed consisted of well over 100 dates and culminated on 19 January 2001 in a show at the Rock in Rio festival in Brazil, where Iron Maiden played to an audience of around 250,000.[109] While the performance was being produced for a CD and DVD release in March 2002, under the name Rock in Rio,[110] the band took a year out from touring, during which they played three consecutive shows at Brixton Academy in aid of former drummer Clive Burr, who had recently announced that he had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.[111] The band performed two further concerts for Burr’s MS Trust Fund charity in 2005,[112] and 2007;[113] before his death in 2013.[114]
Dance of Death and A Matter of Life and Death (2003–2007)
Main articles: Dance of Death (album) and A Matter of Life and Death (album)

Following their Give Me Ed… ‘Til I’m Dead Tour in the summer of 2003, Iron Maiden released Dance of Death, their thirteenth studio album, which was met by worldwide critical and commercial success.[115] Produced by Kevin Shirley, now the band’s regular producer, many critics also felt that this release matched up to their earlier efforts, such as Killers, Piece of Mind and The Number of the Beast.[116] As usual, historical and literary references were present, with “Montségur” in particular being about the Cathar stronghold conquered in 1244,[117] and “Paschendale” relating to the significant battle which took place during The First World War.[118]

The following tour was another landmark for the band, as they played to over 750,000 fans during 50 dates over a period of 4 months in 2003–04, including sold out shows in South America, Europe, North America and Japan. Their performance at Westfalenhalle in Dortmund, Germany, as part of the supporting tour, was recorded and released in August 2005 as a live album and DVD, entitled Death on the Road.[119]

In 2005, the band announced the Eddie Rips Up the World Tour which, tying in with their 2004 DVD entitled The Early Days, only featured material from their first four albums.[120] As part of this celebration of their earlier years, “The Number of the Beast” single was re-released[121] and went straight to No. 3 in the UK Chart.[122] The tour included many headlining stadium and festival dates, including a performance at Ullevi Stadium in Sweden to an audience of almost 60,000.[123] This concert was also broadcast live on satellite television all over Europe to approximately 60 million viewers.[124] Following this run of European shows, the band co-headlined the US festival tour, Ozzfest, with Black Sabbath, their final performance at which earned international press coverage after their show was sabotaged by singer Ozzy Osbourne’s family,[125] who took offence to Dickinson’s remarks against reality-TV.[126] The band completed the tour by headlining the Reading and Leeds Festivals on the 26–28 August,[127] and in Ireland on 31 August to almost 40,000 people at RDS Stadium.[128] For the second time, the band played a charity show for The Clive Burr MS Trust Fund, this time taking place at the Hammersmith Apollo.[112] The same year, the band were inducted into the Hollywood RockWalk in Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles.
At the end of 2005, Iron Maiden began work on A Matter of Life and Death, their fourteenth studio effort, released in autumn 2006. While not a concept album,[129] war and religion are recurring themes in the lyrics, as well as in the cover artwork. The release was a critical and commercial success, earning the band their first top ten in the Billboard 200[130] and receiving the Album of the Year award at the 2006 Classic Rock Roll of Honour Awards.[131] A supporting tour followed, during which they played the album in its entirety; response to this was mixed.[132]

The second part of the “A Matter of Life and Death” tour, which took place in 2007, was dubbed “A Matter of the Beast” to celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Number of the Beast album, and included appearances at several major festivals worldwide.[133] The tour opened in the Middle East with the band’s first performance in Dubai at the Dubai Desert Rock Festival,[134] after which they played to over 30,000 people at the Bangalore Palace Grounds,[135] marking the first concert by any major heavy metal band in the Indian sub-continent.[134] The band went on to play a string of European dates, including an appearance at Download Festival, their fourth headline performance at Donington Park.[136] The show attracted the largest audience in Download’s history, with an estimated attendance of approximately 80,000 people,[137] in spite of higher ticket and camping prices. On 24 June they ended the tour with a performance at London’s Brixton Academy in aid of The Clive Burr MS Trust fund.[113]
Somewhere Back in Time World Tour and Flight 666 (2007–2009)
Main articles: Somewhere Back in Time World Tour and Iron Maiden: Flight 666

On 5 September 2007, the band announced their Somewhere Back in Time World Tour, which tied in with the DVD release of their Live After Death album.[138] The setlist for the tour consisted of successes from the 1980s, with a specific emphasis on the Powerslave era for set design.[138] The first part of the tour, commencing in Mumbai, India on 1 February 2008, consisted of 24 concerts in 21 cities, travelling nearly 50,000 miles in the band’s own chartered aeroplane,[139] named “Ed Force One”.[140] They played their first ever concerts in Costa Rica and Colombia and their first shows in Australia and Puerto Rico since 1992.

Blaze Bayley era, The X Factor and Virtual XI (1994–1999)
Main articles: The X Factor (album) and Virtual XI

In 1994, the band listened to hundreds of tapes sent in by vocalists before convincing Blaze Bayley, formerly of the band Wolfsbane who had supported Iron Maiden in 1990, to audition for them.[86] Bayley had a different vocal style from his predecessor, which ultimately received a mixed reception among fans.[87]

After a two-year hiatus (as well as a three-year hiatus from studio releases – a record for the band at the time) Iron Maiden returned in 1995. Releasing The X Factor, the band had their lowest chart position since 1981 for an album in the UK (debuting at No. 8),[88] although it would go on to win Album of the Year awards in France and Germany.[89] The record included the 11-minute epic “Sign of the Cross”, the band’s longest song since “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”, as well as the singles, “Man on the Edge”, based on the film Falling Down,[90] and “Lord of the Flies”, based on the novel of the same name.[91] The release is notable for its “dark” tone, inspired by Steve Harris’ divorce.[89] The band toured for the rest of 1995 and 1996, playing for the first time in Israel and South Africa,[92] before stopping to release Best of the Beast. The band’s first compilation, it included a new single, “Virus”, whose lyrics attack the critics who had recently written off the band.[93]

Iron Maiden returned to the studio to record Virtual XI, released in 1998. The album’s chart scores were the band’s lowest to date,[94] including the UK where it peaked at No. 16[95] failing to score one million worldwide sales for the first time in Iron Maiden’s history.[96] At the same time, Steve Harris assisted in remastering the band’s entire discography, up to and including Live at Donington (which was given a mainstream release for the first time).[97]

Bayley’s tenure in Iron Maiden ended in January 1999 when he was asked to leave during a band meeting.[98] The dismissal took place due to issues Bayley had experienced with his voice during the Virtual XI World Tour,[99] although Janick Gers has since stated that this was partly the band’s fault for forcing him to perform songs which were beyond his natural register.[100]
Return of Dickinson and Smith, Brave New World (1999–2002)

Carlos Santana

Carlos Santana, best guitarist, guitar hero
Born July 20, 1947 (age 66)
Autlán de Navarro, Jalisco, Mexico
Origin San Francisco, California
Genres Latin rock, chicano rock, rock, blues rock, jazz rock, tejano music, free jazz
Occupations Musician, songwriter, bandleader
Instruments Guitar, percussion, vocals
Years active 1966–present
Labels RCA Records (2011-present) [1]
Arista, Polydor, Columbia, Polygram, CBS
Associated acts Santana, Los Lonely Boys, John McLaughlin
Website santana.com
Notable instruments
PRS Santana II
Yamaha SG2000 Devadip
Yamaha SG175
Gibson SG

Carlos Santana (born July 20, 1947) is a Mexican and American musician who first became famous in the late 1960s and early 1970s with his band, Santana, which pioneered a fusion of rock and Latin American music. The band’s sound featured his melodic, blues-based guitar lines set against Latin and African rhythms featuring percussion instruments such as timbales and congas not generally heard in rock music. Santana continued to work in these forms over the following decades. He experienced a resurgence of popularity and critical acclaim in the late 1990s. In 2003 Rolling Stone magazine listed Santana at number 20 on their list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. He has won 10 Grammy Awards and three Latin Grammy Awards.

Early life

Carlos Santana was born in Autlán de Navarro, Jalisco, Mexico. He learned to play the violin at age five, and the guitar at age eight. His younger brother, Jorge Santana, would also become a professional guitarist. Young Carlos was heavily influenced by Ritchie Valens at a time when there were very few Latinos in American rock and pop music. The family moved from Autlán de Navarro to Tijuana, the city on Mexico’s border with California, and then San Francisco. Carlos stayed in Tijuana but later joined his family in San Francisco, graduating from James Lick Middle School, and in 1965 from Mission High School. Carlos was accepted at California State University, Northridge, and Humboldt State University, but turned down these offers.
Early career

“The ’60s were a leap in human consciousness. Mahatma Gandhi, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Che Guevara, Mother Teresa, they led a revolution of conscience. The Beatles, The Doors, Jimi Hendrix created revolution and evolution themes. The music was like Dalí, with many colors and revolutionary ways. The youth of today must go there to find themselves.”
— Carlos Santana [5]

He got the chance to see his idols (most notably B.B. King) perform live in San Francisco. He was also introduced to a variety of new musical influences, including jazz and folk music, and witnessed the growing hippie movement centered in San Francisco in the 1960s. After several years spent working as a dishwasher in a diner and busking for spare change, Santana decided to become a full-time musician. In 1966 he gained prominence due to a series of accidental events, all happening on the same day. Santana was a frequent spectator at Bill Graham’s Fillmore West. During a Sunday matinee show, Paul Butterfield was slated to perform there but was unable to do so as a result of being intoxicated. Bill Graham assembled an impromptu band of musicians he knew primarily through his connections with the Grateful Dead, Butterfield’s own band, and Jefferson Airplane, but he had not yet chosen all the guitarists. Santana’s manager, Stan Marcum, immediately suggested to Graham that Santana join the impromptu band and Graham agreed. During the jam session, Santana’s guitar playing and solo gained the notice of both the audience and Graham.[6] During the same year, Santana formed the Santana Blues Band, with fellow street musicians David Brown (bass guitar) , Marcus Malone (percussion) and Gregg Rolie (lead vocals, Hammond Organ B3).[7]

With their highly original blend of Latin-infused rock, jazz, blues, salsa, and African rhythms, the band (which quickly adopted their frontman’s name, Santana) gained an immediate following on the San Francisco club circuit. The band’s early success, capped off by a memorable performance at Woodstock in 1969, led to him signing a recording contract with Columbia Records, then run by Clive Davis.
Santana
Record deal, Woodstock breakthrough and height of success: 1969-72

Santana was signed by CBS Records and went into the studio to record their first album. They were not satisfied with the release and decided changes needed to be made. This resulted in the dismissal of drummer Bob Livingston. Santana replaced him with Mike Shrieve, who had a strong background in both jazz and rock. Percussionist Marcus Malone was forced to quit the band due to involuntary manslaughter charges, and the band re-enlisted Michael Carabello. Carabello brought with him percussionist Jose Chepito Areas, who was already well known in his country, Nicaragua, and, with his skills and professional experience, was a major contributor to the band.

Bill Graham, a Latin Music aficionado, had been a fan of the band from its inception, and arranged for them to appear at the Woodstock Music and Art Festival before their debut album was even released. They were one of the surprises of the festival; their set was legendary and later the exposure of their eleven-minute instrumental “Soul Sacrifice” in the Woodstock film and soundtrack album vastly increased their popularity. Graham also gave the band some key advice to record the Willie Bobo song “Evil Ways”, as he felt it would get them radio airplay. Their first album, Santana, was released in August 1969 and became a huge hit, reaching #4 on the U.S. album charts, with the catchy single “Evil Ways” reaching number nine on the Billboard Hot 100.[citation needed]
Santana performing in Hamburg in November of 1973

In 1969, the band’s performance at the Woodstock festival introduced them to an international audience and garnered critical acclaim, although the band’s sudden success put pressure on the group, highlighting the different musical directions in which Rolie and Santana were starting to go. Rolie, along with some of the other band members, wanted to emphasize a basic hard rock sound which had been a key component in establishing the band from the start. Santana, however, was increasingly interested in moving beyond his love of blues and rock and wanted more jazzy, ethereal elements in the music, which were influenced by his fascination with Gábor Szabó, Miles Davis, Pharoah Sanders, and John Coltrane, as well as his growing interest in spirituality. At the same time, Chepito Areas was stricken with a near-fatal brain hemorrhage, and Santana hoped to continue by finding a temporary replacement (first Willie Bobo, then Coke Escovedo), while others in the band, especially Michael Carabello, felt it was wrong to perform publicly without Areas. Cliques formed, and the band started to disintegrate.

Consolidating the interest generated by their first album, and their highly acclaimed live performance at the Woodstock Festival in August 1969, the band followed up with their second album, Abraxas, in September 1970. The album’s mix of rock, blues, jazz, salsa and other influences was very well received, showing a musical maturation from their first album and refining the band’s early sound. Abraxas included two of Santana’s most enduring and well-known hits, “Oye Como Va,” and “Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen.” Abraxas spent six weeks at #1 on the Billboard chart at the end of 1970.[8] The album remained on the charts for 88 weeks and was certified 4x platinum in 1986.[9] In 2003 the album was ranked number 205 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.[10]

Teenage San Francisco Bay Area guitar prodigy Neal Schon was asked to join the band in 1971, in time to complete the third album, Santana III. The band now boasted a powerful dual-lead-guitar act that gave the album a tougher sound. The sound of the band was also helped by the return of a recuperated Chepito Areas and the assistance of Coke Escovedo in the percussion section. Enhancing the band’s sound further was the support of popular Bay Area group Tower of Power’s horn section, Luis Gasca of Malo, and other session musicians which added to both percussion and vocals, injecting more energy to the proceedings. Santana III was another success, reaching #1 on the album charts, selling two million copies, and yielding the hits “Everybody’s Everything” and “No One to Depend On”.
New Year’s Eve 1976 at the Cow Palace in San Francisco

Tension between members of the band continued, however. Along with musical differences, drug use became a problem, and Santana was deeply worried that it was affecting the band’s performance. Coke Escovedo encouraged Santana to take more control of the band’s musical direction, much to the dismay of some of the others who thought that the band and its sound was a collective effort. Also, financial irregularities were exposed while under the management of Stan Marcum, whom Bill Graham criticized as being incompetent. Growing resentments between Santana and Michael Carabello over lifestyle issues resulted in his departure on bad terms. James Mingo Lewis was hired at the last minute as a replacement at a concert in New York City. David Brown later left due to substance abuse problems. A South American tour was cut short in Lima, Peru, due to student protests against U.S. governmental policies and unruly fans. The madness of the tour convinced Santana that changes needed to be made in the band and in his life.[citation needed]

In January 1972, Santana, Schon, Escovedo, and Lewis joined former Band of Gypsys drummer, Buddy Miles, for a concert at Hawaii’s Diamond Head Crater, which was recorded for the album Carlos Santana & Buddy Miles! Live!. The performance was erratic and uneven, but the album managed to achieve gold-record status on the weight of Santana’s popularity.
Caravanserai

In early 1972, Santana and the remaining members of the band started working on their fourth album, Caravanserai. During the studio sessions, Santana and Michael Shrieve brought in other musicians: percussionists James Mingo Lewis and Latin-Jazz veteran, Armando Peraza replacing Michael Carabello, and bassists Tom Rutley and Doug Rauch replacing David Brown. Also assisting on keyboards were Wendy Haas and Tom Coster. With the unsettling influx of new players in the studio, Gregg Rolie and Neal Schon decided that it was time to leave after the completion of the album, even though both contributed to the session. Rolie returned home to Seattle, and later became a founding member of Journey (which Schon would later join as well).

When Caravanserai did emerge in 1972, it marked a strong change in musical direction towards jazz fusion. The album received critical praise, but CBS executive Clive Davis warned Santana and the band that it would sabotage the band’s position as a “Top 40” act. Nevertheless, over the years, the album would achieve platinum status. The difficulties Santana and the band went through during this period were chronicled in Ben Fong-Torres’ Rolling Stone 1972 cover story “The Resurrection of Carlos Santana”.

Santana met Deborah King, whom he later married in 1973. She is the daughter of late blues singer and guitarist Saunders King. They have three children: Salvador, Stella and Angelica. Together with wife Deborah, Santana founded a not-for-profit organization, the Milagro (“Miracle”) Foundation, which provides financial aid for educational, medical, and other needs.
Shifting styles and spirituality: 1972-79

In 1972, Santana became a huge fan of pioneering fusion band The Mahavishnu Orchestra and its guitarist, John McLaughlin. Aware of Santana’s interest in meditation, McLaughlin introduced Santana and Deborah to his guru, Sri Chinmoy. Chinmoy accepted them as disciples in 1973. Santana was given the name Devadip, meaning “The lamp, light and eye of God”. Santana and McLaughlin recorded an album together, Love, Devotion, Surrender with members of Santana and The Mahavishnu Orchestra, along with percussionist Don Alias and organist Larry Young, who both had made appearances on Miles Davis’ classic Bitches Brew in 1969.

In 1973 Santana, having obtained legal rights to the band’s name, Santana, formed a new version of the band with Armando Peraza and Chepito Areas on percussion, Doug Rauch on bass, Michael Shrieve on drums, and Tom Coster and Richard Kermode on keyboards. Santana later was able to recruit jazz vocalist Leon Thomas for a tour of Japan, which was recorded for the live, sprawling, high-energy fusion album Lotus. CBS records would not allow its release unless the material was condensed. Santana did not agree to those terms, and Lotus was available in the U.S. only as an expensive, imported, three-record set. The group later went into the studio and recorded Welcome, which further reflected Santana’s interests in jazz fusion and his increasing commitment to the spiritual life of Sri Chinmoy.
Santana during his “inner secrets” tour in the Netherlands in 1978

A collaboration with John Coltrane’s widow, Alice Coltrane, Illuminations, followed. The album delved into avant-garde esoteric free jazz, Eastern Indian and classical influences with other ex-Miles Davis sidemen Jack DeJohnette and Dave Holland. Soon after, Santana replaced his band members again. This time Kermode, Thomas and Rauch departed from the group and were replaced by vocalist Leon Patillo (later a successful Contemporary Christian artist) and returning bassist David Brown. He also recruited soprano saxophonist, Jules Broussard for the lineup. The band recorded one studio album Borboletta, which was released in 1974. Drummer Leon “Ndugu” Chancler later joined the band as a replacement for Michael Shrieve, who left to pursue a solo career.

By this time Bill Graham’s management company had assumed responsibility for the affairs of the group. Graham was critical of Santana’s move into jazz and felt he needed to concentrate on getting Santana back into the charts with the edgy, streetwise ethnic sound that had made them famous. Santana himself was seeing that the group’s direction was alienating many fans. Although the albums and performances were given good reviews by critics in jazz and jazz fusion circles, sales had plummeted.

Santana, along with Tom Coster, producer David Rubinson, and Chancler, formed yet another version of Santana, adding vocalist Greg Walker. The 1976 album Amigos, which featured the songs “Dance, Sister, Dance” and “Let It Shine”, had a strong funk and Latin sound. The album received considerable airplay on FM album-oriented rock stations with the instrumental “Europa (Earth’s Cry Heaven’s Smile)” and re-introduced Santana to the charts. In 1976 Rolling Stone ran a second cover story on Santana entitled “Santana Comes Home”.

The albums conceived through the late 1970s followed the same formula, although with several lineup changes. Among the new personnel who joined was current percussionist Raul Rekow, who joined in early 1977. Most notable of the band’s commercial efforts of this era was a version of the 1960s Zombies hit, “She’s Not There”, on the 1977 album Moonflower.

The relative success of the band’s albums in this era allowed Santana to pursue a solo career funded by CBS. First, Oneness: Silver Dreams – Golden Reality, in 1979 and The Swing of Delight in 1980, which featured some of his musical heroes: Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Ron Carter and Tony Williams from Miles Davis’ legendary 1960s quintet.[citation needed]

The pressures and temptations of being a high-profile rock musician and requirements of the spiritual lifestyle which guru Sri Chinmoy and his followers demanded were in conflict, and imposed considerable stress upon Santana’s lifestyle and marriage. He was becoming increasingly disillusioned with what he thought were the unreasonable rules that Chinmoy imposed on his life, and in particular with his refusal to allow Santana and Deborah to start a family. He felt too that his fame was being used to increase the guru’s visibility. Santana and Deborah eventually ended their relationship with Chinmoy in 1982.
The 1980s
Santana, 1984, Barcelona, Spain

More radio-pleasing singles followed from Santana and the band. “Winning” in 1981 (from Zebop) and “Hold On” (a remake of Canadian artist Ian Thomas’ song) in 1982 both reached the top twenty. After his break with Sri Chinmoy, Santana went into the studio to record another solo album with Keith Olson and legendary R&B producer Jerry Wexler. The 1983 album revisited Santana’s early musical experiences in Tijuana with Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love” and the title cut, Chuck Berry’s “Havana Moon”. The album’s guests included Booker T. Jones, The Fabulous Thunderbirds, Willie Nelson and even Santana’s father’s mariachi orchestra. Santana again paid tribute to his early rock roots by doing the film score to La Bamba, which was based on the tragically short life of rock and roll legend Ritchie Valens and starred Lou Diamond Phillips.

Although the band had concentrated on trying to produce albums with commercial appeal during the 1980s, changing tastes in popular culture began to reflect in the band’s sagging record sales of their latest effort Beyond Appearances. In 1985, Bill Graham had to once again pull strings for Santana to convince principal Live Aid concert organizer Bob Geldof to allow the band to appear at the festival.[citation needed] The group’s high-energy performance proved they were still a top concert draw the world over despite their poor performance on the charts. Santana regained a great deal of respect in both jazz and rock circles, with Prince and guitarist Kirk Hammett of Metallica citing him as an influence.[citation needed]

The band Santana returned in 1987 with a new album Freedom.
L to R: Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, and Santana in Hamburg, May 1984

Growing weary of trying to appease record company executives with formulaic hit records, Santana took great pleasure in jamming and making guest appearances with notables such as the jazz fusion group Weather Report, jazz pianist McCoy Tyner, Blues legend John Lee Hooker, Frank Franklin, Living Colour guitarist Vernon Reid, and West African singer Salif Keita. He and Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead later recorded and performed with Nigerian drummer Babatunde Olatunji, who conceived one of Santana’s famous 1960s drum jams, “Jingo”. In 1988 Santana organized a reunion with past members from the Santana band for a series of concert dates. CBS records released a 20-year retrospective of the band’s accomplishments with Viva Santana!.

That same year Santana formed an all-instrumental group featuring jazz legend Wayne Shorter on tenor and soprano saxophone. The group also included Patrice Rushen on keyboards, Alphonso Johnson on bass, Armando Peraza and Chepito Areas on percussion, and Leon “Ndugu” Chancler on drums. They toured briefly and received much acclaim from the music press, who compared the effort with the era of Caravanserai. Santana released another solo record, Blues for Salvador, which won a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance.

In 1990 Santana left Columbia Records after twenty-two years and signed with Polygram. The following year he made a guest appearance on Ottmar Liebert’s album, Solo Para Ti, on the songs “Reaching out 2 U” and on a cover of his own song, “Samba Pa Ti”. In 1992 Santana hired jam band Phish as his opening act.
Return to commercial success
Santana performing in 2000

Santana kicked off the 1990s with a new album Spirits Dancing in the Flesh in 1990. This was followed by Milagro in 1992, a live album Sacred Fire in 1993 and Brothers (a collaboration with his brother Jorge and nephew Carlos Hernandez) in 1994. But sales were relatively poor. Santana toured widely over the next few years but there were no further new album releases, and eventually he was even without a recording contract. However, Arista Records’ Clive Davis, who had worked with Santana at Columbia Records, signed him and encouraged him to record a star-studded album with mostly younger artists. The result was 1999’s Supernatural, which included collaborations with Everlast, Rob Thomas of Matchbox Twenty, Eric Clapton, Lauryn Hill, Wyclef Jean, Cee Lo Green, Maná, Dave Matthews, K. C. Porter, J. B. Eckl, and others.

However, the lead single was what grabbed the attention of both fans and the music industry. “Smooth”, a dynamic cha-cha stop-start number co-written and sung by Rob Thomas of Matchbox Twenty, was laced throughout with Santana’s guitar fills and runs. The track’s energy was immediately apparent on radio, and it was played on a wide variety of station formats. “Smooth” spent twelve weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming in the process the last #1 single of the 1990s. The music video, set on a hot barrio street, was also very popular. Supernatural reached number one on the US album charts and the follow-up single, “Maria Maria”, featuring the R&B duo The Product G&B, also hit number one, spending ten weeks there in the spring of 2000. Supernatural eventually sold over 15 million copies in the United States, making it Santana’s biggest sales success by far.

Carlos Santana, alongside the classic Santana lineup of their first two albums, was inducted as an individual, into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. He performed “Black Magic Woman” with the writer of the song, Fleetwood Mac’s founder Peter Green. Green was inducted the same night.

In 2000 Supernatural won nine Grammy Awards (eight for Santana personally), including Album of the Year, Record of the Year for “Smooth”, and Song of the Year for Thomas and Itaal Shur. Santana’s acceptance speeches described his feelings about music’s place in one’s spiritual existence. Later that year at the Latin Grammy Awards he won three awards including Record of the Year. In 2001, Santana’s guitar skills were featured in Michael Jackson’s song “Whatever Happens”, from the album Invincible.

In 2002, Santana released Shaman, revisiting the Supernatural format of guest artists including P.O.D. and Seal. Although the album was not the runaway success its predecessor had been, it produced two radio-friendly hits. “The Game of Love” featuring Michelle Branch, rose to number five on the Billboard Hot 100 and spent many weeks at the top of the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, and “Why Don’t You & I” written by and featuring Chad Kroeger from the group Nickelback (the original and a remix with Alex Band from the group The Calling were combined towards chart performance) which reached number eight on the Billboard Hot 100. “The Game of Love” went on to win the Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals.

In early August 2003, Santana was named fifteenth on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time”.

On April 21, 2005, Santana was honored as a BMI Icon at the 12th annual BMI Latin Awards. Santana was the first songwriter designated a BMI Icon at the company’s Latin Awards. The honor is given to a creator who has been “a unique and indelible influence on generations of music makers.” [11]
Carlos Santana during a concert in 2005

In 2005, Herbie Hancock approached Santana to collaborate on an album again using the Supernatural formula. Possibilities was released on August 30, 2005, featuring Carlos Santana and Angélique Kidjo on “Safiatou”. Also, in 2005, fellow Latin star Shakira invited Santana to play the soft rock guitar ballad “Illegal” on her second English-language studio album Oral Fixation Vol. 2.

Santana’s 2005 album All That I Am consists primarily of collaborations with other artists; the first single, the peppy “I’m Feeling You”, was again with Michelle Branch and The Wreckers. Other musicians joining the mix this time included Steven Tyler of Aerosmith, Kirk Hammett from Metallica, hip-hop/reggae star Sean Paul and R&B singer Joss Stone. In April and May 2006, Santana toured Europe, where he promoted his son Salvador Santana’s band as his opening act.

In 2007, Santana appeared, along with Sheila E. and José Feliciano, on Gloria Estefan’s album 90 Millas, on the single “No Llores”. He also teamed again with Chad Kroeger for the hit single “Into the Night”.

In 2008, Santana was reported to be working with his longtime friend, Marcelo Vieira, on his solo album Acoustic Demos, which was released at the end of the year. It features tracks such as “For Flavia” and “Across the Grave”, the latter said to feature heavy melodic riffs by Santana.

Carlos Santana performed at the 2009 American Idol Finale with the top 13 finalists, which starred many acts such as KISS, Queen and Rod Stewart. On July 8, 2009, Carlos Santana appeared at the Athens Olympic Stadium in Athens with his 10-member all-star band as part of his “Supernatural Santana – A Trip through the Hits” European tour. On July 10, 2009, he also appeared at Philip II Stadium in Skopje, Macedonia. With a 2.5 hour long concert and 20 000 people, Santana appeared for the first time in that region. “Supernatural Santana – A Trip through the Hits” was played at The Hard Rock hotel in Las Vegas, where it was played through 2011.

Santana is featured as a playable character in the music video game Guitar Hero 5. A live recording of his song “No One To Depend On” is included in game, which was released on September 1, 2009.[12] More recently, in 2011, three Santana songs were offered as downloadable content (DLC) for guitar learning software Rocksmith: “Oye Como Va,” “Smooth,” and “Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen.”

Carlos recently opened a chain of upscale Mexican restaurants called “Maria Maria”. It is a combined effort with Chef Roberto Santibañez. They are located in Tempe, Arizona; Mill Valley (now closed), Walnut Creek, Danville and San Diego, California; Austin, Texas; and Boca Raton, Florida.[13]

In 2012 Santana released an album Shape Shifter consisting of mostly instrumental tracks
Influences

Around the age of eight, Santana “fell under the influence” of blues performers like B.B. King, Javier Bátiz, and John Lee Hooker.[14] Gábor Szabó’s mid-1960s jazz/gypsy guitar work may have strongly influenced Santana’s playing. Szabó’s composition “Gypsy Queen” was used as the second part of Santana’s 1970 hit “Black Magic Woman”, almost down to identical guitar licks. Santana also credits Jimi Hendrix, Mike Bloomfield, Hank Marvin and Peter Green as important influences; he considered Bloomfield a direct mentor, writing of a key meeting with Bloomfield in San Francisco in the foreword he wrote to a biography of Bloomfield, Michael Bloomfield: If You Love These Blues-An Oral History in 2000.[15]
Equipment
Guitars and effects
Santana’s Yamaha SG2000 Devadip (1976, with inlay) on exhibit in the Berlin Musical Instrument Museum

Santana played a red Gibson SG Special with P-90 pickups at the Woodstock festival. During the time between the release of Abraxas and Santana III (1970–1972), he used different Gibson Les Pauls and a Black Gibson SG Special. From 1976 until 1982 his main guitar was a Yamaha SG 175B, and sometimes a white Gibson SG Custom with 3 single coil pick-ups. In 1982 he started to use a custom made PRS Custom 24 guitar. In 1988 PRS Guitars began making Santana signature model guitars, which Santana has played through its various iterations ever since (see below).

Santana currently uses a Santana II model guitar fitted with PRS Santana III nickel covered pickups, a tremolo bar, and .009-.042 gauge D’Addario strings. He also plays a PRS Santana Multidimensional (MD)[16] The Santana guitars feature necks made of a single piece of mahogany topped with Rosewood fretboards (some feature highly sought-after Brazilian Rosewood[17]). This helps create the smooth, singing, glass-like tone for which he is known.

Santana Signature Models:

PRS Santana I “The Yellow”(1988)
PRS Santana II “Supernatural” (1999)
PRS Santana III (2001)
PRS Santana SE (2001)
PRS Santana SE II (2003)
PRS Santana Shaman SE-Limited Edition (2003)
PRS Santana MD “The Multidimensional” (2008)
PRS Santana Abraxas SE-Limited Edition (2009)
PRS Santana SE “The Multidimensional” (2011)

Santana also uses a classical guitar, the Alvarez Yairi CY127CE with Alvarez tension nylon strings.[18]

Santana does not use many effects pedals. His PRS guitar is connected to a Mu-Tron wah wah pedal (or, more recently, a Dunlop 535Q wah[19] and a T-Rex Replica delay pedal.[20][21] then through a customized Jim Dunlop amp switcher which in turn is connected to the different amps or cabinets.

Previous setups include an Ibanez Tube Screamer[22] right after the guitar. He is also to have been known to use an Electro Harmonix Big Muff distortion for his famous sustain. In the song “Stand Up” from the album Marathon, Santana uses a Heil talk box in the guitar solo. He has also used the Audiotech Guitar Products 1×6 Rack Mount Audio Switcher in rehearsals for the 2008 “Live Your Light” tour.

Santana uses two different guitar picks: the large triangular Dunlop he has used for so many years, and the V-Pick Freakishly Large Round.
Amplifiers

Carlos Santana’s distinctive guitar tone is produced by PRS Santana signature guitars plugged into multiple amplifiers. The amps consist of a Mesa Boogie Mark I, Dumble Overdrive Reverb and more recently a Bludotone amplifier. Santana compares the tonal qualities of each amplifier to that of a singer producing head/nasal tones, chest tones, and belly tones. A three-way amp switcher is employed on Carlos’s pedal board to enable him to switch between amps. Often the unique tones of each amplifier are blended together, complementing each other producing a richer tone.

He also put the “Boogie” in Mesa Boogie. Santana is credited with coining the popular Mesa amplifier name when he tried one and exclaimed, “That little thing really Boogies!”[23]

Specifically, Santana combines a Mesa/Boogie Mark I head running through a Boogie cabinet with Altec 417-8H (or recently JBL E120s) speakers, and a Dumble Overdrive Reverb and/or a Dumble Overdrive Special running through a Brown or Marshall 4×12 cabinet with Celestion G12M “Greenback” speakers, depending on the desired sound. Shure KSM-32 microphones are used to pick up the sound, going to the PA. Additionally, a Fender Cyber-Twin Amp is mostly used at home.

During his early career Santana used a GMT transistor amplifier stack and a silverface Fender Twin. The GMT 226A rig was used at the Woodstock concert as well as during recording Santana’s debut album. During this era Santana had also began to use the Fender Twin, which was also used on the debut and proceedingly at the recording sessions of Abraxas.
Personal life

Carlos Santana became a naturalized US citizen in 1965.[24]

On October 19, 2007, his wife of 34 years, Deborah Santana, filed for divorce citing “irreconcilable differences”.

Carlos Santana became engaged to drummer Cindy Blackman, after proposing to her during a concert of the Universal Tone Tour at Tinley Park in Chicago, Illinois on July 9, 2010. The two were married in December 2010.[26][27] They currently live in Las Vegas.[28]
Discography
Main articles: Carlos Santana discography and Santana (band) discography

Love Devotion Surrender (1973)
Illuminations (1974)
Oneness — Silver Dreams Golden Reality (1979)
The Swing of Delight (1980)
Havana Moon (1983)
Blues for Salvador (1987)
Santana Brothers (1994)

Awards and nominations

Santana’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

Year Recipient Award Result
1973 “Caravanserai” Best Pop Instrumental Performance – With Vocal Coloring Nominated
1988 “Blues for Salvador” Best Rock Instrumental Performance (Orchestra, Group Or Soloist) Won
1993 “Gypsy/Grajonca” Best Rock Instrumental Performance Nominated
1996 “Every Now And Then” Best Rock Instrumental Performance Nominated
2000 “Smooth” Record of the Year Won
Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals Won
“Supernatural” Album of the Year Won
Best Rock Album Won
“Maria Maria” Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal Won
“El Farol” Best Pop Instrumental Performance Won
“The Calling” Best Rock Instrumental Performance Won
“Put Your Lights On” Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group Won
“Love Of My Life” Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals Nominated
2002 “The Game of Love” Best Pop Collaboration With Vocals Won

Source Wikipedia

Crucified Barbara

Crucified Barbara, female metal band, female musical band, best female metal band
Origin Stockholm, Sweden
Genres Hard rock, heavy metal, thrash metal
Years active 1998–present
Website crucifiedbarbara.com
Members Mia Coldheart
Klara Force
Ida Evileye
Nicki Wicked

Crucified Barbara started out in 1998 as a punk rock band, but soon they changed their primary style to hard rock . They signed in 2003 with GMR Music Group of Stockholm. Recordings took place in Kristianopel, Sweden at Pama Studios/Blakk Records with producer-engineer Mankan Sedenberg during the spring of 2004. Their advance debut single from their first album In Distortion We Trust, was “Losing the Game”. It was released on 8 December 2005 and went straight to No. 8 on the Swedish music charts. The video to accompany it was recorded and produced by M Industries. The album was released in Sweden on 19 January and is available outside Sweden in several countries including the U.K, the U.S.A, France, Germany, and Benelux. In 2006, they contributed two songs, “Killed by Death” and “Please Don’t Touch”, to St. Valentines Day Massacre, a tribute album to Motörhead.

Crucified Barbara’s second album, Til Death Do Us Party, was released in Scandinavia on 11 February 2009 and in the rest of Europe on February 27.[1] It was produced in part by Mats Levén (known for producing albums by Yngwie Malmsteen, Krux, and Therion, among other bands within that genre.[2] Mats also sang vocals on the song “Jennyfer”.

In November 2009 Crucified Barbara went out on a six weeks European tour to promote the new album Til Death Do Us Party. They played in Germany, Belgium, Holland, France, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Czech Republic and Sweden. A documentary film was made about the tour by film-maker Mats Lundberg from Doom Films. The movie’s preliminary release date is set to late 2010.
Lineup

The current lineup is:

Mia Coldheart (Mia Karlsson) – Vocals, Guitar
Klara Force (Klara Rönnqvist Fors) – Guitar, Backing vocals
Ida Evileye (Ida Stenbacka) – Bass guitar, Backing vocals
Nicki Wicked (Jannicke Lindström) – Drums, Backing vocals

Discography
Album
Title Date of Release US Chart
Position UK Chart
Position
In Distortion We Trust
January 2005 — —
‘Til Death Do Us Party
February 2009 — —
The Midnight Chase
July 31, 2012 — —
Singles
Title Date of Release US Chart
Position UK Chart
Position
“Losing the Game” 2005 — —
“Rock’n’Roll Bachelor” 2005 — —
“Play Me Hard” 2006 — —
“Jennyfer” 2010 — —
Tours

In November 2006, they supported Motörhead along with Clutch.[3] They played at the heavy metal festival Sweden Rock in June, 2006 and again in 2009,[4] with bands such as Heaven & Hell, In Flames and Dream Theater. In 2010 they played at Wacken Open Air. In 2013 they played at Graspop Metal Meeting and Metalfest in Czech Republic.

Children Of Bodom

children of bodom, metal band from finland, best metal band, melodic metal band
Origin Espoo, Finland
Genres Melodic death metal, power metal, neoclassical metal, symphonic black metal (early)
Years active 1993–present
Labels Nuclear Blast, Spinefarm, Century Media, Fearless
Associated acts Norther, Sinergy, Kylähullut, Warmen, Stone, Timo Rautiainen
Website www.cobhc.com
Members Alexi Laiho
Jaska Raatikainen
Henkka Seppälä
Janne Wirman
Roope Latvala
Past members Samuli Miettinen
Alexander Kuoppala
Jani Pirisjoki

Formation and early years (1993–1997)

Children of Bodom was formed in 1993 by guitarist Alexi “Wildchild” Laiho and drummer Jaska Raatikainen under the name of Inearthed. Both musicians had known each other since early childhood and had shared an interest in heavy metal, especially death metal groups, such as Dissection, Entombed, and Obituary. Bassist Samuli Miettinen completed the initial line-up of the band. Inearthed recorded its first demo, Implosion of Heaven, during August of the same year.

Samuli was the main composer of the band’s lyrics for the two years that he took part in Inearthed, but his family moved to the United States in 1995, making it impossible for him to remain in the band. His last contributions to Inearthed were the lyrics of the songs from their second demo, Ubiquitous Absence of Remission which was the first time they worked with producer Anssi Kippo at Astia-studios (Lappeenranta, Finland). In this demo, keyboards were incorporated into the band’s songs for the first time. In order to achieve this, both Laiho and Raatikainen played the keyboards separately, and subsequently mixed the recorded track with the other instruments. Laiho, who had previously only composed the melodies of the songs, assumed the role of the band’s lyricist.

At the time, Raatikainen played French horn in a local big band, and during a rehearsal he met Alexander Kuoppala, a trumpet player and also a proficient guitarist. Shortly after the recording of their second demo, Kuoppala was invited to join Inearthed as a rhythm guitarist.

The bassist chosen to replace Samuli was Henkka “Blacksmith” Seppälä, whom Laiho and Raatikainen had previously known from school. Apart from playing the bass, Seppälä also often doubles as the band’s backing vocalist. Also, the band recruited a musician to specialize on keyboards, whose name was Jani Pirisjoki. Both joined Inearthed in early 1996.

With this new line-up, Inearthed proceeded to record their third demo, entitled Shining. This demo did not impress record labels any more than the previous ones had, and none took interest in the band.[6] Despite their efforts, their music got little exposure and managed only to play at local events. As a last resort, the band decided to record an independent, self-funded album. Considering that none of the musicians had much money to begin with, it was an audacious move.

Laiho wanted to make use of the keyboards more effectively, but Pirisjoki was not attending rehearsals. Thus, he was fired and replaced by a friend of Raatikainen’s, a jazz pianist named Janne “Warman” Wirman.[6]

Wirman was the component which was previously missing from Inearthed. His presence allowed the band to assume the style which would later characterize Children of Bodom. With Wirman, the band successfully recorded their first album in 1997. Their debut, Something Wild, was supposed to be released by a small Belgian label, Shiver Records, but second vocalist Sami Tenetz (from Thy Serpent) acquired a copy of their album through the hands of Kuoppala. They both worked for the same company at the time. Shortly after Inearthed signed this contract, Spinefarm Records’ boss immediately became interested in signing them for a country-wide release.[citation needed] The latter deal was much more attractive to the band, since the Belgian label was offering them close to no help, to the point where they would have to distribute and sell the album themselves.

The band was required to create a new name to sign up to Spinefarm Records. The contract with Shiver records had already been signed under the name of Inearthed. The answer to that problem came as the members looked for good names in their local phone book. When they stumbled upon Lake Bodom, they realized that it was a name with impact and one which had an interesting story behind it. A long list of possible names involving the word Bodom was then made, and they settled with Children of Bodom. The band’s name is derived from the Lake Bodom murders.[7]
Something Wild (1997—1998)

Something Wild was produced, recorded and mixed by Anssi Kippo and Children of Bodom at Astia-studios (Lappeenranta, Finland). In an attempt to promote their band, they opened a show for Dimmu Borgir in 1997. Their success was such that a representative from the Nuclear Blast label shortly approached them with a contract for a European release, a deal which started on the subsequent year.[citation needed] Something Wild was officially released in November 1997, and for promotional purposes the band recorded a music video of the song “Deadnight Warrior”. The video was directed by Mika Lindberg and had a slim budget of €1000. It made use of simple scenery, which consisted essentially of an outdoors location after a snowstorm. The band played for a couple of hours at night, with an average temperature of minus fifteen degrees Celsius.

Although Laiho is very critical of all of the music he has written, he notes that he dislikes Something Wild the most of all of his albums. When recording this album, Laiho had tried to mimic the style of one of his idols, Yngwie Malmsteen, which is why Something Wild is considered one of the most technical albums Children of Bodom have ever produced. Despite this, he still considers it to be their “most important” record, as it “put them on the map.”

Children of Bodom’s first European tour began in February 1998. They played with bands such as Hypocrisy (at such festivals as Under the Black Sun), The Kovenant and Agathodaimon, but suffered from the absence of Wirman, who was concentrating on finishing his studies.[citation needed] He was replaced by pianist Erna Siikavirta for the duration of the tour.

Months later, the band recorded two new songs again at Astia-studios with producer Anssi Kippo, entitled “Towards Dead End” and “Children of Bodom”. The latter was included in a compilation by Spinefarm Records, which after being released remained on the top of Finnish charts for eight consecutive weeks.[citation needed] In late August, the band played the song “Forevermore” live for the first time during a show in Russia. This song was later renamed “Downfall”.

Their second European tour occurred in September of that same year, but once more Wirman was not able to perform with them. Laiho’s then-girlfriend Kimberly Goss (from Sinergy and formerly of Dimmu Borgir, Ancient and Therion) assumed the keyboards this time. By the end of the tour, Kimberly invited Laiho to join Sinergy, which at the time was still in its early stages.
Hatebreeder (1998–2000)

The second album, Hatebreeder, was recorded between the end of 1998 and the beginning of 1999 by Anssi Kippo at Astia-studios (Lappeenranta, Finland). It was originally entitled Towards Dead End, but while in studio the members of the band opted for the current title. To create anticipation in Finland, the ‘”Downfall” single was released two weeks prior to the album’s release. It was accompanied by a new music video, once more directed by Mika Lindberg. Hatebreeder ultimately topped the charts in many European countries. In July 1999, the success of the “Downfall” single and Hatebreeder allowed Children of Bodom to schedule three concerts in Japan with Sinergy and In Flames. During two of these concerts, the live album Tokyo Warhearts was recorded. In it the band managed to seamlessly reproduce and at times improve on their songs. This was a notable achievement for a band with only two albums recorded previously. Under their request, no overdubs were used on the recording of the concert.
Follow the Reaper (2000–2002)

For their next release, Children of Bodom decided to make use of Peter Tägtgren’s Abyss studio in Sweden instead of the Finnish Astia-studio from Anssi Kippo where they had recorded all of their previous releases including the demos from Inearthed. The band wrote eight new songs for this album. While in the studio, they decided to include an extra track that was hastily composed and featured lyrics improvised by Laiho; that track would eventually receive the name of “Kissing the Shadows”. The band gave the album the name of Follow the Reaper and recording sessions took place between August and September 2000; the album saw a worldwide release in late 2000. A music video for “Everytime I Die” was recorded by the Finnish director Tuukka Temonen shortly after.
Hate Crew Deathroll (2002–2004)

In February 2002, Children of Bodom began writing songs for their upcoming album, entitled Hate Crew Deathroll. They returned to Astia-studio (Lappeenranta, Finland) to work with producer Anssi Kippo again. The session ensued during the months of August and September, and the album was released January 2003 in Finland. It remained on the top of the Finnish charts for a total of three weeks and subsequently became the band’s first gold album. Eventually all of the band’s albums reached this status and Follow the Reaper reached platinum.

On January 3, 2003, the Finnish Metal Music Awards were held at Tavastia Club in Helsinki. Voting was open to all the metal fans and was presented through the various media outlets that were working with the event’s organizers. Children of Bodom was awarded Finnish Band of the Year.[8]

Children of Bodom’s first world tour began in 2003 and lasted until late 2004. The tour had many sold-out concerts and marked the consolidation of the band in North America, but was also accompanied by an unexpected announcement: Kuoppala decided to quit Children of Bodom for personal reasons right in the middle of the tour without giving previous warning. In an interview, when Laiho was asked why Kuoppala left the band, he stated that, “Well, I try to be careful about what I say about him because there is no bad blood between us. He told me that he just got sick of touring and the whole band/rock ‘n roll lifestyle living in hotels and tour buses and stuff. For me it was really weird because he was always the one who was SO into it! He was a die hard rock ‘n roller and suddenly he made a quick 180 turn in his whole life. This whole situation involves a new girlfriend.”[9] Griffin’s guitarist Kai Nergaard was invited by Laiho to replace Kuoppala, but did not accept the offer. Thus, Alexi’s bandmate from Sinergy, Roope Latvala (founding member of Stone, one of the bands which started the heavy metal movement in Finland) assumed the guitars as a session player, until a more permanent solution could be found. This formation was introduced in Moscow on the 16th of August.
Are You Dead Yet? (2004–2007)
Children of Bodom live in Milan 2006.

After successfully finishing the world tour with Latvala — who then assumed a permanent position in the band’s line-up — Children of Bodom proceeded to record and release the EP Trashed, Lost & Strungout and the single “In Your Face”, which contained songs from their upcoming album and a parody cover of “Oops!… I Did It Again” by Britney Spears. In late 2005, the album Are You Dead Yet? was released, featuring a style different from what had been presented by the band on its previous works. Simpler and heavier guitar riffs were incorporated into Children of Bodom’s sound, as well as elements from industrial music. Reactions from fans to the release were varied; however, the album remains the band’s most commercially successful. It was awarded gold status in Finland and reached first place on the Finnish charts, 16th in Germany, 16 in Sweden and 17 in Japan. The next release of the band was a DVD-single for the song “In Your Face”, which included the music video, backstage footage from the band and a live recording of the song “Sixpounder” at Wacken Open Air festival in 2004. In June, Children Of Bodom was in front of 120,000 spectators, one of their biggest concerts on the last concert of the Böhse Onkelz. On the DVD of the concert, the Vaya Con Tioz was called, Children of Bodom were also with the song “Everytime I Die” represented.

Children of Bodom’s live DVD Chaos Ridden Years – Stockholm Knockout Live was released on December 5, 2006. It contains a recording of a live concert performed on February 5, 2006 in Stockholm, Sweden, with over 90 minutes of live footage. “Chaos Ridden Years” refers to a documentary featuring interviews with band members about the history of the band and footage of the band on tour. It also contains every official music video Children of Bodom has ever made, except for “Needled 24/7”. Guitarist Alexi Laiho was voted world’s best guitarist of 2006 by Metal Hammer magazine.

In June 2006, the band embarked on one of their biggest tours: The Unholy Alliance tour, playing alongside Slayer, Lamb of God, Mastodon, In Flames and Thine Eyes Bleed. The bands toured the US through June and July and Europe through October and November.

On January 31, 2007, Laiho slid down the lane at a bowling alley after accidentally stepping over the foul line. He slammed hard into the wall, breaking his left shoulder. This rendered him unable to play guitar for six weeks. Due to this incident, Children of Bodom was forced to cancel their first 2007 tours and a festival that they were slated to headline.

On March 31, 2007, the band’s website released information on Laiho’s condition stating that while Laiho’s injury will never fully heal, it no longer affects his ability to play a guitar. The same notice also stated that the band had already written some songs for a new album and would start recording sometime later in 2007.[10]

Children of Bodom was selected to replace Velvet Revolver for the Monsters of Rock festival, playing on the same stage as Ozzy Osbourne and Megadeth.
Blooddrunk (2007–2009)
Live at 2007’s Masters of Rock.

From October to December 2007, Children of Bodom recorded their sixth studio album, entitled Blooddrunk, which was released on April 15, 2008.[11] The album contained 10 songs including a cover of “Ghost Riders in the Sky.” Children of Bodom was featured on the Gigantour 2008 North American tour with Megadeth, In Flames, Job for a Cowboy and High on Fire.[12] Children of Bodom was one of the first bands to be confirmed for Wacken Open Air 2008, where they performed alongside many bands including Iron Maiden, Sonata Arctica and Avantasia.[13] Children of Bodom played at Donington Download on the 15th of June, playing a mixture of old and new songs. On March 8, 2008, Children of Bodom did their first ever UK signing event at the Zavvi music shop in Oxford Street, London. They signed copies of their new single “Blooddrunk” in CD, 7 inch and 12 inch vinyls,[14] only 666 copies of the 12 inch vinyls have been made.[15]

On 26 June 2008, Children of Bodom played their first show in Auckland, New Zealand with support from local scene acts Dawn of Azazel and Subtract at the Transmission Room.[16] In 2008, Children of Bodom’s first three studio albums, as well as Tokyo Warhearts, were remastered and re-released with bonus tracks. In September and October 2008, the band toured the USA supporting Blooddrunk with support from The Black Dahlia Murder and Between the Buried and Me. Testament also made a special guest appearance in the main support slot at the tour’s New York City date. In November and December 2008, the band toured in Europe supporting Slipknot and Machine Head. From late January to early March 2009, the band also co-headlined the European tour with Cannibal Corpse with Diablo opening for them. On April 2, 2009, Children of Bodom embarked on the No Fear Energy Tour headlined by Lamb of God with main support from As I Lay Dying and themselves, and rotating opening slots with God Forbid and Municipal Waste, but unfortunately dropped off the tour a week before it was finished following a serious injury Alexi suffered after falling from the top bunk of his tour bus on April 26, 2009, after the show in Palladium Ballroom, Dallas TX. In addition to the injury, on May 8, 2009, at Roseland Ballroom in New York City, Alexi and Children of Bodom were forced to quit playing after a few of their songs because of Alexi’s previous injury. Laiho originally planned to continue touring despite his injury, but was forced to cancel last six dates when any efforts to alleviate the pain failed. All summer festival dates went down as planned and were unaffected by Alexi’s injury.[17][18]

In February 2009, Children of Bodom hinted at plans to release a cover album entitled Skeletons in the Closet, which was released on September 23, 2009.[19] They also admitted to being “lazy” when it comes to practicing and talked about plans to have more songs on future albums.[20] The band embarked on a tour of South America and Mexico in September 2009. Support on the trek came from Amorphis. Also in September and October 2009 the band returned to North America to headline a massive, month-long tour. On most dates support on the trek came from The Black Dahlia Murder and Skeletonwitch. Austrian Death Machine and Holy Grail made a special guest appearance in the main support slot at the tour’s second Pomona, California date.[21][22] In October,18th, 2009, four days after the band’s North American tour finale in Honolulu, Hawaii they performed at Japan’s Loudpark Festival along with Megadeth, Judas Priest, Slayer, Anthrax, Rob Zombie & Arch Enemy. In the immediate six days following their performance at the Loudpark Festival, they held three shows in Hong Kong, Taiwan and China respectively. They finished their two month September to October tour in Moscow, Russia. This concluded their year and a half long Blooddrunk World Tour.
Skeletons in the Closet (2009–2010)

Skeletons in the Closet is a cover album released on September 22, 2009. It features covers released on versions of previous albums but also includes four new tracks. Covered artists include Suicidal Tendencies, Britney Spears, Alice Cooper, Iron Maiden, Slayer, Andrew WK, Billy Idol and Scorpions

Pre-orders through Children of Bodom’s official website included an autographed copy of the album and a T-shirt with the album’s design on it.[23]

Children of Bodom featured a contest to promote their new album in which anyone could win prizes featuring an ESP/LTD M-53 electric guitar, the band’s entire back catalog, and Skeletons in the Closet. The contest ran from August 25 to September 21, 2009. The winners were announced September 28, 2009.
Relentless Reckless Forever (2010–2012)

After the Blooddrunk tour ended, Children of Bodom started recording their new album. During the recording of the drum tracks there was a small tornado and the power was cut out. Consequently the recording was delayed until after their tour with Black Label Society. Children Of Bodom released some information to Metal Hammer magazine about new album tracks. The three track names they released were entitled: “Pussyfoot Miss Suicide”, “Ugly”, and “Was It Worth It?”[24][25]

In November the band announced “The Ugly World Tour 2011” which would run from March–May 2011 and would feature dates around Europe. Opening Acts were Ensiferum, Machinae Supremacy and Amon Amarth (UK only). On November 24, it was announced that the title of the album would be Relentless Reckless Forever. The album was released on March 8, 2011. A music video for “Was It Worth It?” was produced, featuring skateboarder Chris Cole as well as noted pro skaters Jamie Thomas, Garrett Hill and Tom Asta.[26] “Was It Worth It?” was released as a downloadable track for Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock on February 2, 2011 for European PlayStation 3 owners, and February 8, 2011 for Xbox 360 and Nintendo Wii worldwide, as well as non-European PlayStation 3 owners.

Relentless Reckless Forever was certified gold (sold over 10,000 copies) in Finland on the first day of its release, March 9.[27] As of March 10, the album had sold over 100,000 copies worldwide.[28]
Halo of Blood (2012–present)

Halo of Blood is the band’s eighth studio album. It was released on June 6 in Europe, June 10 in the United Kingdom and on June 11 in North America. The Mayhem Festival tour alongside Rob Zombie, Mastodon and Amon Amarth was also announced on March 18, 2013.

Music journalist Neil Kelly of PopMatters said in praise of the album, “Death metal could very well re-enter mainstream consciousness through Halo of Blood, the most accessible Children of Bodom release yet.”[29]

In May 2014, the band will tour eastern Australia, visiting Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne with Eye of the Enemy as support, along with Orpheus Omega in Melbourne.[30]
Band members

Current members

Alexi Laiho – lead vocals, lead guitar (1993–present)
Jaska Raatikainen – drums, percussion (1993–present)
Henkka Seppälä – bass guitar, backing vocals (1996–present)
Janne Wirman – keyboards, synthesizers (1997–present)
Roope Latvala – guitar, backing vocals (2003–present)

Former members

Samuli Miettinen – bass guitar, backing vocals (1993–1995)
Jani Pirisjoki – keyboards, synthesizers (1995–1997)
Alexander Kuoppala – rhythm guitar, backing vocals (1995–2003)

Touring musicians

Kimberly Goss – keyboards (1998)
Erna Siikavirta – keyboards (1998)

Source: Wikipedia

Scorpions

best rock band, slow rock band, best german band
Origin Hanover, Germany
Genres Heavy metal,[1][2] hard rock[3][4]
Years active 1965–present
Labels Rhino, RCA, EMI
Associated acts UFO, The Michael Schenker Group, Electric Sun
Website www.the-scorpions.com
Members Rudolf Schenker
Klaus Meine
Matthias Jabs
James Kottak
Paweł Mąciwoda

Scorpions are a German rock band formed in 1965. Since the band’s inception, their musical style has ranged from hard rock to heavy metal.The band’s only constant member is guitarist Rudolf Schenker, although Klaus Meine has been lead singer for all their studio albums. They are known for their 1980s rock anthem “Rock You Like a Hurricane” and many singles, such as “No One Like You”, “Send Me an Angel”, “Still Loving You”, and “Wind of Change”. The band was ranked No. 46 on VH1’s Greatest Artists of Hard Rock program. “Rock You Like a Hurricane” is also No. 18 on VH1’s list of the 100 Greatest Hard Rock Songs.

The band is one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time, with claims of sales around 75 million to 100 million records worldwide.

History
Formation and early history (1965–1973)

Rudolf Schenker, the band’s rhythm guitarist launched the band in 1965. At first, the band had beat influences and Schenker himself did the vocals.[13] Things began to come together in 1970 when Schenker’s younger brother Michael and vocalist Klaus Meine joined the band. In 1972 the group recorded and released their debut album Lonesome Crow, with Lothar Heimberg on bass and Wolfgang Dziony on drums.[14] During the Lonesome Crow tour, Scorpions opened for upcoming British band UFO. Near the end of the tour, guitarist Michael Schenker accepted an offer of lead guitar for UFO. Uli Roth, a friend of the Schenker brothers, was then called in to finish off the tour.

The departure of Michael Schenker led to the breakup of the band. In 1973, Uli Roth, who had helped Scorpions complete the Lonesome Crow tour, was offered the role as lead guitarist, but turned the band down, preferring instead to remain in the band Dawn Road. Rudolf Schenker eventually decided that he wanted to work with Roth, but did not want to resurrect the last Scorpions lineup. He attended some of Dawn Road’s rehearsals and ultimately decided to join the band, which consisted of Roth, Francis Buchholz (bass), Achim Kirschning (keyboards) and Jürgen Rosenthal (drums). Roth and Buchholz persuaded Rudolf Schenker to invite Klaus Meine to join on vocals, which he soon did. While there were more members of Dawn Road than Scorpions in the band, they decided to use the Scorpions name because it was well known in the German hard rock scene and an album had been released under that name.[15]
Rise to fame (1974–1978)

In 1974, the new line-up of Scorpions released Fly to the Rainbow. The album proved to be more successful than Lonesome Crow and songs such as “Speedy’s Coming” and the title track established the band’s sound. Achim Kirschning decided to leave after the recordings. Soon after, Jürgen Rosenthal had to leave as he was being drafted into the army. In 1976, he would join a German progressive rock band called Eloy recording three albums. He was replaced by a Belgian drummer, Rudy Lenners.

In 1975, the band released In Trance, which marked the beginning of Scorpions’ long collaboration with German producer Dieter Dierks. The album was a huge step forward for Scorpions and established their heavy metal formula. It garnered a fan base at home and abroad with cuts such as “In Trance”, “Dark Lady” and “Robot Man”.

In 1976, Scorpions released Virgin Killer. The album’s cover featured a nude prepubescent girl behind a broken pane of glass. The cover art was designed by Stefan Bohle who was the product manager for RCA Records,[16] their label at the time. The cover brought the band considerable market exposure but was subsequently pulled or replaced in other countries. The album itself garnered demographic praise for its music from select critics and fan base. In 2008 this image was blacklisted from the English wikipedia by the Internet Watch Foundation, see Internet Watch Foundation and Wikipedia.

The following year, Rudy Lenners resigned for personal reasons and was replaced by Herman Rarebell.

For the follow-up Taken by Force, RCA Records made a determined effort to promote the album in stores and on the radio. The album’s single, “Steamrock Fever”, was added to some of RCA’s radio promotional records. Roth was not happy with the commercial direction the band was taking. Although he performed on the band’s Japan tour, he departed to form his own band, Electric Sun prior to the release of the resultant double live album Tokyo Tapes. Tokyo Tapes was released in the US and Europe six months after its Japanese release. By that time in mid 1978, after auditioning around 140 guitarists, Scorpions recruited guitarist Matthias Jabs.
Commercial success (1979–1991)

Following the addition of Jabs, Scorpions left RCA for Mercury Records in the United States and Harvest/EMI Electrola worldwide to record their next album Lovedrive. Just weeks after being ejected from UFO for his alcohol abuse, Michael Schenker also returned to the group for a short period during the recordings for the album. This gave the band three guitarists (though Schenker’s contribution to the final release was limited to only three songs). The result was Lovedrive, an album which some critics consider to be the pinnacle of their career.[17] Containing such fan favourites as “Loving You Sunday Morning”, “Always Somewhere”, “Holiday” and the instrumental “Coast to Coast”, it firmly cemented the ‘Scorpions formula’ of hard rock songs mixed with melodic ballads. The album’s provocative artwork was named “Best album sleeve of 1979” by Playboy magazine, yet ultimately changed for American release. Lovedrive reached No. 55 on the US charts, demonstrating that the band was gathering an international following. After the completion and release of the album the band decided to retain Michael in the band, forcing Jabs to leave. However after a few weeks of the tour, Michael, still coping with alcoholism missed a number of gigs and at one point collapsed on stage. Jabs was brought back to fill in for him on those occasions when he could not perform. In April 1979, during their tour in France, Jabs was brought in permanently to replace Michael.
The Scorpions’ logo

In 1980 the band released Animal Magnetism, again with a provocative cover this time showing a girl kneeling and a Doberman Pinscher sitting in front of a man. Animal Magnetism contained classics such as “The Zoo” and “Make It Real”. Soon after the album’s release, Meine began experiencing throat problems. He required surgery on his vocal cords and doubts were raised about whether he would ever sing again.

Meanwhile, the band began working on their next album, Blackout in 1981. Don Dokken was brought in to provide guide and backing vocals while Meine recovered.[18] Meine eventually healed completely and was able to finish the album. Blackout was released in 1982 and quickly became the band’s best selling album to date, eventually going platinum. Meine’s voice showed no signs of weakness and fan response to the album was good. Blackout spawned three singles: “Dynamite”, “Blackout”, and “No One Like You”.

Gaining in popularity from their success from “Blackout”, Scorpions performed to over 375,000 fans on Day 2 at the three-day US Festival concert held in San Bernardino, California during Memorial Day Weekend of 1983. The concert was aired live on MTV, giving the band wide exposure in a live show.

It was not until 1984 and the release of Love at First Sting that the band finally cemented their status as the internationally popular band they are now known as. Propelled by the single “Rock You Like a Hurricane”, Love at First Sting climbed the charts and went double platinum in the USA a few months after its release.

MTV gave the album’s videos “Rock You Like a Hurricane”, “Bad Boys Running Wild”, “Big City Nights”, and the power ballad “Still Loving You” significant airtime greatly contributing to the album’s success. The channel even supplied Scorpions with the nickname “The Ambassadors of Rock” to the chagrin of industry insiders who recognized the executive influence behind the scenes. The Rolling Stone magazine named them “The Heroes of Heavy Metal”.

The band toured extensively behind Love at First Sting and decided to record and release their second live album, World Wide Live in 1985. Recorded over a year-long world tour and released at the height of their popularity, the album was another success for the band, peaking at No. 14 in the charts in the US and at No. 18 in the UK.

After their extensive world tours, the band finally returned to the studio to record Savage Amusement. Released in 1988, four years after their previous studio album, Savage Amusement represented a more polished and mature sound similar to the style Def Leppard had found success with. The album sold well but was considered somewhat of a critical disappointment. However, British heavy rock magazine Kerrang! did award the album five K’s out of five.

On the Savage Amusement tour in 1988, Scorpions became only the second Western group (not American) to play in the Soviet Union. Uriah Heep had performed in December, 1987 in Leningrad. The following year the band returned to perform at the Moscow Music Peace Festival. As a result, Scorpions developed an extended Russian fan base and still return to perform.[19]

Wishing to distance themselves from the Savage Amusement style, the band separated from their long-time producer and “Sixth Scorpion”, Dieter Dierks, replacing him with Keith Olsen when they returned to the studio in 1990. Crazy World was released that same year and displayed a less polished sound. The album was propelled in large part by the massive success of the ballad “Wind of Change”. The song muses on the socio-political changes that were occurring in Eastern Europe and in other parts of the world at the end of the Cold War. On July 21, 1990 they joined many other guests for Roger Waters’ massive performance of The Wall in Berlin. Scorpions performed both versions of “In the Flesh” from The Wall. After the Crazy World tour Francis Buchholz, the band’s long-serving bassist, left the group.
Later days (1992–2009)

In 1993, Scorpions released Face the Heat. Bass was handled by Ralph Rieckermann. For the recording process, Scorpions brought in producer Bruce Fairbairn. The album’s sound was more metal than melodic. Neither the heavy metal single “Alien Nation” nor the ballad “Under The Same Sun” came close to matching the success of “Wind of Change”. Face the Heat was a moderate success. In 1995, a new album, Live Bites, was produced. The disc documented retro live performances from their Savage Amusement Tour in 1988, all the way through the Face the Heat Tour in 1994. While the album had a technologically cleaner sound in comparison to their best-selling live album, World Wide Live, it was not as successful.

Prior to recording their 13th studio album, 1996s Pure Instinct, drummer Herman Rarebell left the band to set up a recording label. Curt Cress took charge of the drumsticks for the album before Louisville, Kentucky-born James Kottak took over permanently. The album had many ballads. Still, the album’s singles “Wild Child” and the soothing ballad “You and I” both enjoyed moderate success.

1999 saw the release of Eye II Eye and a significant change in the band’s style, mixing in elements of pop and techno. While the album was slickly produced. The video to the album’s first European single, “To Be No. 1”, featured a Monica Lewinsky look-alike which did little to improve its popularity.

The following year, Scorpions had an artistic collaboration with the Berlin Philharmonic that resulted in a 10-song album named Moment of Glory. The album went a long way toward rebuilding the band’s reputation after the harsh criticism of Eye II Eye. However, critics accused them of following on the coattails of Metallica’s similar collaboration (S&M) with the San Francisco Symphony which had been released the previous year, even though the orchestra had first approached Scorpions with the idea in 1995.
Scorpions in 2007

In 2001, Scorpions released Acoustica, a live unplugged album featuring acoustic reworkings of the band’s biggest hits, plus new tracks. While appreciated by fans, the lack of a new studio album was frustrating to some, and Acoustica did little to return the band to the spotlight.

In 2004, the band released Unbreakable, an album that was hailed by critics as a long-awaited return to form. The album was the heaviest the band had released since Face the Heat. Whether a result of poor promotion by the band’s label or the long time between studio releases, Unbreakable received little airplay and did not chart. Scorpions toured extensively behind the album and played as ‘Special Guests’ with Judas Priest during the 2005 British tour—these were the Scorpions’ first dates in the UK since 1999.

In early 2006, Scorpions released the DVD 1 Night in Vienna that included 14 live tracks and a complete rockumentary. In LA, the band spent about four months in the studio with producers James Michael and Desmond Child working on a concept album titled Humanity: Hour I, which was released in late May 2007, and was followed by the “Humanity World Tour”.

In 2007, the band collaborated with two of their signature tracks in the video game series, “Guitar Hero.” “No One Like You” was featured on the “Rocks the ’80s” version of the game while “Rock You Like A Hurricane” was released on “Guitar Hero 3: Legends of Rock.”

On May 14, 2007, Scorpions released Humanity – Hour I in Europe. Humanity – Hour I became available in the U.S. on August 28 on New Door Records, entering the Billboard charts at number No. 63.

In a September 2007 podcast interview, Meine said the album was not so much a “concept album”, but rather a collection of songs with a common theme. “We didn’t want to make another record with songs about boys chasing girls. I mean, come on, give me a break,” Meine said.

Asked in 2007 if the band was planning to release a Humanity – Hour II, Meine replied:
“     That is what everybody is asking. There might be. Who knows? Right now we are at the beginning of the world tour. It is exciting to play the new songs and they go very well with the classics. It is exciting that there is a whole new audience out there. There are many longtime fans but there are a lot of young kids. We just played in London and in Paris and there were young kids rocking out to songs that were written way before they were born. It is amazing. I don’t want to think about Hour II right now because Hour I is so exciting. It is very inspiring to see how much the audience enjoys this new music.     ”

— Klaus Meine

On December 20, 2007, Scorpions played at a concert for the elite of Russia’s security forces in the Kremlin. The concert was a celebration of the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Cheka—predecessor of the KGB. The band has claimed that they thought they were performing a Christmas concert. They have said that their concert was by no means a tribute to the Cheka, communism, or Russia’s brutal past. Members of the audience included Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Medvedev.

On February 21, 2009, Scorpions received Germany’s ECHO Honorary Award for lifetime achievement at Berlin’s O2 World.
Sting in the Tail, touring and next album (2010–present)

In November 2009, Scorpions announced that their 17th studio album, Sting in the Tail, would be released in early 2010, recorded in Hanover with Swedish producers Mikael “Nord” Andersson and Martin Hansen. Sting in the Tail was released on March 23, 2010.

On January 24, 2010, the band announced their intentions for Sting in the Tail to be their last album, with the tour supporting it being their final tour, although the band later made the decision to continue recording past the end of the tour.Dokken was scheduled to open for them but canceled after a dispute.

On 6 April 2010, Scorpions were enshrined in Hollywood’s Rock Walk in a handprint ceremony, with the band members placing their hands in a long slab of wet cement next to other musical artists.

An album of re-recordings of older songs, Comeblack, was released on 7 November 2011.

Frontman Klaus Meine was asked in a July 2011 interview about the future of Scorpions and whether the band was going to make another album. He replied, “Our newest project comes out in the next few months. It gives you a chance to experience the Scorpions in 3D. You can actually feel the smoke string out of the guitar like it is a live show. It is an incredible experience. The DVD features our concerts in 3D in Germany. We are just about to do the mix and it should be in the Middle East and Saudi Arabia hopefully soon. Indeed, the strong 3D technology makes us feel like pioneers after all these years (he says, laughing). We have an album coming out later this year featuring classics. You know our love for them. The ’60s was the era for our inspiration. Our movie/documentary also is soon to be released. We have cameras with us on tours, so this documentary is being made during our tours. It also gives you a picture of the Scorpions career and journey.”

Almost a year in advance it was announced Scorpions would headline the Wacken Open Air Festival on 4 August.

Despite ongoing rumours of a break up or retirement, guitarist Matthias Jabs told AZ Central on June 12, 2012 that Scorpions would not be splitting up. A month later, Jabs told Billboard magazine that the band has been working on an album that will contain unreleased songs they recorded for the albums Blackout, Love at First Sting, Savage Amusement and Crazy World and plan to release it in 2014. In April Scorpions announced shows in Russia and Belarus with an orchestra in October 2013. On 11, 12, and 14 September 2013, the Scorpions played three MTV Unplugged concerts at the Lycabettus-Theatre in Athens.[35] On November 6, 2013 they announce 4 more MTV Unplugged Concert in Germany 2014. In December 2013 in an interview at Rock Show radio program in Greece, Klaus Meine said he is not sure if the album that will contain unreleased songs they recorded for the albums Blackout, Love at First Sting, Savage Amusement and Crazy World is going to be released in 2014 or later on.
Band members
Current members

Rudolf Schenker — rhythm and lead guitars, backing vocals, lead vocals in “They Need a Million”, “Hey You” and “Love is the Answer” (1965–present)
Klaus Meine — lead vocals, guitars (1970–present)
Matthias Jabs — lead and rhythm guitars, backing vocals (1978, 1979–present)
James Kottak — drums, backing vocals (1996–present)
Paweł Mąciwoda — bass, backing vocals (2004–present)

Former members

Lothar Heimberg — bass, backing vocals (1965–1973)
Wolfgang Dziony — drums, percussion, backing vocals (1965–1973)
Karl-Heinz Vollmer – lead & rhythm guitars, backing vocals (1965–1970)
Michael Schenker — lead & rhythm guitars, backing vocals (1970–1973, 1978–1979)
Francis Buchholz — bass, backing vocals (1973–1983, 1984–1992)
Uli Jon Roth — lead & rhythm guitars, backing vocals, lead vocals on “Drifting Sun”, “Fly to the Rainbow”, “Dark Lady”, “Sun in My Hand”, “Hell Cat”, “Polar Nights” (1973–1978)
Jürgen Rosenthal — drums, percussion, backing vocals (1973–1975)
Achim Kirschning — keyboards (1973–1974)
Rudy Lenners — drums, percussion (1975–1977)
Joe Wyman – drums, percussion (1977)
Herman Rarebell — drums, percussion, backing vocals (1977–1983, 1984–1995)
Ralph Rieckermann — bass, backing vocals (1993–2000, 2000–2003)
Curt Cress — drums, percussion (1996)
Ken Taylor — bass, backing vocals (2000)
Ingo Powitzer — bass, backing vocals (2004)

Manager

Leber/Krebs (Management 1979-1980er)
Doc Mc Ghee (Management 80er/90er)
Peter F. Amend (Lawyer, Booker and Manager 1991–present)
Stewart Young (1995–present)
Tom Consolo (Front Line Management;Frontline Management Group, Azoffmusic Management; North-America, 2011)
Steve Martin (The Agency Group, 2012)

Source: Wikipedia

Happy birthday Kurt

Nirvana, kurt cobain, gurnge music
Kurt Cobain (foreground) and Krist Novoselic live at the 1992 MTV Video Music Awards.
Background information
Birth name Kurt Donald Cobain
Also known as Kurdt Kobain
Born February 20, 1967
Aberdeen, Washington, U.S.
Died April 5, 1994 (aged 27)
Seattle, Washington, U.S.
Genres Grunge, alternative rock
Occupations Musician, singer-songwriter, artist
Instruments Vocals, guitar
Years active 1982–1994
Labels Sub Pop, DGC, Geffen
Associated acts Nirvana, Fecal Matter
Notable instruments
Fender Jag-Stang
Fender Jaguar
Fender Mustang
Fender Stratocaster
Martin D-18E
Univox Hi-Flier Mosrite “The Ventures” Guitar

Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. April 5, 1994) was an American musician and artist. He was best known as the lead singer, guitarist, and primary songwriter of the grunge band Nirvana. Cobain formed Nirvana with Krist Novoselic in Aberdeen, Washington, in 1985 and established it as part of the Seattle music scene, having its debut album Bleach released on the independent record label Sub Pop in 1989.

After signing with major label DGC Records, the band found breakthrough success with “Smells Like Teen Spirit” from its second album Nevermind (1991). Following the success of Nevermind, Nirvana was labeled “the flagship band” of Generation X, and Cobain hailed as “the spokesman of a generation”.Cobain, however, was often uncomfortable and frustrated, believing his message and artistic vision to have been misinterpreted by the public, with his personal issues often subject to media attention. He challenged Nirvana’s audience with its final studio album In Utero (1993). It did not match the sales figures of Nevermind but was still a critical and commercial success.

During the last years of his life, Cobain struggled with heroin addiction, illness and depression. He also had difficulty coping with his fame and public image, and the professional and lifelong personal pressures surrounding himself and his wife, musician Courtney Love. On April 8, 1994, Cobain was found dead at his home in Seattle, the victim of what was officially ruled a suicide by a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the head. The circumstances of his death at age 27 have become a topic of public fascination and debate. Since their debut, Nirvana, with Cobain as a songwriter, has sold over 25 million albums in the US, and over 75 million worldwide.

Early life

Kurt Donald Cobain was born on February 20, 1967, at Grays Harbor Hospital in Aberdeen, Washington, to a waitress, Wendy Elizabeth (née Fradenburg) (born 1948),and an automotive mechanic, Donald Leland Cobain (born 1946). His parents were married on July 31, 1965 in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. His ancestry included Irish, English, Scottish, and German.Cobain’s Irish ancestors migrated from County Tyrone of Northern Ireland in 1875.[6] Researchers have found them to have been shoemakers, originally named Cobane, who came from the village of Inishatieve near Pomeroy, settling in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada, and then in Washington.Cobain himself believed his family came from County Cork in southern Ireland.Cobain had one younger sister named Kimberly, born on April 24, 1970.[3][5]

Cobain’s family had a musical background. His maternal uncle Chuck Fradenburg starred in a band called The Beachcombers, his Aunt Mari Earle played guitar and performed in bands throughout Grays Harbor County, and his great-uncle Delbert had a career as an Irish tenor, making an appearance in the 1930 film King of Jazz. Cobain was described as being a happy and excitable, while sensitive and caring child. His talent as an artist was evident from an early age. His bedroom was described as having taken on the appearance of an art studio,[2] where he would accurately draw his favorite characters from films and cartoons such as Aquaman, the Creature from the Black Lagoon, and Disney characters like Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse, and Pluto.[9] This enthusiasm was encouraged by his grandmother Iris Cobain, who was a professional artist herself. Cobain began developing an interest in music early in his life. According to his Aunt Mari, he began singing at two years old. At age four, Cobain started playing the piano and singing, writing a song about their trip to a local park. He listened to artists like the Ramones[10] and Electric Light Orchestra[11] and would sing songs like Arlo Guthrie’s “Motorcycle Song,” The Beatles’ “Hey Jude”, Terry Jacks’ “Seasons in the Sun” and the theme song to The Monkees television show at a young age.[12]

When Cobain was seven years old, his parents divorced.[13] Later in his life, he said the divorce had a profound effect on his life. His mother noted that his personality changed dramatically; Cobain became defiant and withdrawn.[14] In a 1993 interview, he elaborated:

“I remember feeling ashamed, for some reason. I was ashamed of my parents. I couldn’t face some of my friends at school anymore, because I desperately wanted to have the classic, you know, typical family. Mother, father. I wanted that security, so I resented my parents for quite a few years because of that.”

Cobain’s parents both found new partners after the divorce. His father had promised not to remarry; however, after meeting Jenny Westeby, he did, to Kurt’s dismay. Kurt, his father, Westeby, and her two children Mindy and James, moved into a new household together. Cobain liked Westeby at first, who gave him the maternal attention he desired. In January 1979, Westeby gave birth to a boy, Chad Cobain. This new family, which Cobain insisted was not his real one, was in stark contrast to the attention Cobain was used to receiving as an only boy; he soon began to express resentment toward his stepmother. Kurt’s mother began dating a man who was abusive. Cobain witnessed the domestic violence inflicted upon her, with one incident resulting in her being hospitalized with a broken arm. Wendy steadfastly refused to press charges, remaining completely committed to the relationship.

Kurt behaved insolently toward adults. He began bullying another boy at school. These behaviors eventually caused his father and Westeby to take him to a therapist, who concluded that Kurt would benefit in a single family environment.[18] Both sides of the family attempted to bring his parents back together, but to no avail. On June 28, 1979, Cobain’s mother granted full custody of Kurt to his father.

Cobain’s teenage rebellion quickly became overwhelming for his father, who placed Kurt in the care of family and friends. While living with the born-again Christian family of his friend Jesse Reed, Cobain became a devout Christian and regularly attended church services. Cobain later renounced Christianity, engaging in what would be described as “anti-God” rants. The song “Lithium” is about his experience while living with the Reed family. Religion would remain an important part of Cobain’s personal life and beliefs, as he often used Christian imagery in his work and maintained a constant interest in Jainism and Buddhist philosophy. The band name Nirvana was taken from the Buddhist concept, which Cobain described as “freedom from pain, suffering and the external world,” which paralleled with the punk rock ethic and ideology. Cobain would regard himself as both a Buddhist and a Jain during different points of his life, educating himself about the philosophies through various sources, including through watching late night television documentaries on both subjects.

Although not interested in sports, Kurt was enrolled in a junior high school wrestling team at the insistence of his father. Kurt was a skilled wrestler, yet despised the experience. Because of the ridicule he endured from his teammates and coach, he allowed himself to be pinned, in an attempt to sadden his father. Later, his father enlisted him in a little league baseball team, where Cobain would intentionally strike out to avoid playing on the team.

Cobain befriended a homosexual student at school, and suffered bullying from heterosexual students who concluded that Cobain was gay. In an interview he said that he liked having the identity of being gay because he did not like people and when they thought he was gay they left him alone. Kurt stated, “I started being really proud of the fact that I was gay even though I wasn’t”. His friend tried to kiss him and Kurt backed away and told his friend he was not gay but would still be friends with him. In a 1993 interview with The Advocate, Cobain claimed that he was “gay in spirit” and “probably could be bisexual.” He also stated that he used to spray paint “God Is Gay” on pickup trucks in the Aberdeen area. Aberdeen police records show that Cobain was arrested for spray painting the phrase “Ain’t got no how watchamacallit” on other vehicles. One of his personal journals states, “I am not gay, although I wish I were, just to piss off homophobes.”

Cobain enjoyed creating works of art. He would often draw during school classes, including objects associated with human anatomy. When given a caricature assignment for an art course, Cobain drew a posing Michael Jackson. When his art teacher told him the caricature would be inappropriate to be displayed in a school hallway, Cobain drew an unflattering sketch of then-President Ronald Reagan.

As attested to by several of Cobain’s classmates and family members, the first concert he attended was Sammy Hagar and Quarterflash at the Seattle Center Coliseum in 1983. Cobain, however, claimed that the first concert he attended was the Melvins; he wrote prolifically in his Journals of the experience. As a teenager living in Montesano, Cobain eventually found escape through the thriving Pacific Northwest punk scene, going to punk rock shows in Seattle. Cobain soon began frequenting the practice space of fellow Montesano musicians the Melvins.

During his second year in high school, Cobain began living with his mother in Aberdeen. Two weeks prior to graduation, he dropped out of Aberdeen High School upon realizing he did not have enough credits to graduate. His mother gave him a choice: find employment or leave. After one week, Cobain found his clothes and other belongings packed away in boxes. Feeling banished from his own mother’s home, Cobain stayed with friends, occasionally sneaking back into his mother’s basement.Cobain also claimed during periods of homelessness to have lived under a bridge over the Wishkah River, an experience that inspired the Nevermind track “Something in the Way”. However, Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic said, “He hung out there, but you couldn’t live on those muddy banks, with the tides coming up and down. That was his own revisionism.”

In late 1986 Cobain moved into an apartment, paying his rent by working at “The Polynesian Resort”, a Polynesian coastal resort approximately 20 miles (32 km) north of Aberdeen. During this period, he was traveling frequently to Olympia, Washington to go to rock concerts. During his visits to Olympia, Cobain formed a relationship with Tracy Marander. The couple had a close relationship, but one that was often strained with financial difficulties and Cobain’s absence when touring. Marander supported the couple by working at the cafeteria of the Seattle–Tacoma International Airport, often stealing food. Cobain spent most of his time sleeping into the late evening, watching television and concentrating on art projects. Marander’s insistence that he get a job caused arguments that influenced Cobain to write “About a Girl”, which was featured on the Nirvana album Bleach. Marander is credited with having taken the cover photo for the album. Marander was not aware that “About a Girl” was written about her until years after Cobain’s death.

Soon after Marander separated from him, Cobain began dating Tobi Vail, an influential DIY punk zinester of the riot grrrl band Bikini Kill. After meeting Vail, Cobain vomited as he was so completely overwhelmed with anxiety regarding his infatuation with her. This event would inspire the lyric: “Love you so much it makes me sick,” which would appear in the song “Aneurysm”. While Cobain would regard Vail as his female counterpart, his relationship with her waned. Cobain desired the maternal comfort of a traditional relationship, which Vail regarded as sexist within a countercultural punk rock community. Those who dated Vail would be described by her friend Alice Wheeler as “fashion accessories.” Kurt and Tobi spent most of their time together as a couple discussing political and philosophical issues. In 1990 they collaborated on a musical project called “Bathtub Is Real”, in which both Vail and Cobain sang, played guitar and drums. They recorded their songs on a four-track tape machine that belonged to Vail’s father. In Everett True’s 2009 book “Nirvana: The Biography” Vail is quoted as saying “(Kurt) would play the songs he was writing, I would play the songs I was writing and we’d record them on my dad’s four-track. Sometimes I’d sing on the songs he was writing and play drums on them….. He was really into the fact that I was creative and into music. I don’t think he’d ever played music with a girl before. He was super-inspiring and fun to play with.” Slim Moon described their sound as “… like the minimal quiet pop songs that Olympia is known for. Both of them sang; it was really good.” Cobain’s relationship with Vail would inspire the lyrical content of many of the songs on Nevermind. Once, while discussing anarchism and punk rock with friend Kathleen Hanna, Hanna spray-painted “Kurt Smells Like Teen Spirit” on Kurt’s apartment wall. Teen Spirit was the name of a deodorant Vail wore; Hanna joked that Cobain smelled like it. Cobain, unaware of this, initially interpreted the slogan as having a revolutionary meaning. The slogan inspired the title to the song “Smells Like Teen Spirit”.

Shocking Blue

best band, shocking blue, love buzz
Origin The Hague, Netherlands
Genres Rock, nederbeat, psychedelic rock, blues rock, folk rock
Years active 1967–1974
Labels Pink Elephant, Polydor, Penny Farthing, Colossus
Past members Mariska Veres
Robbie van Leeuwen
Cor van der Beek
Klaasje van der Wal
Fred de Wilde
Henk Smitskamp
Leo van de Ketterij
Martin van Wijk

Shocking Blue was a Dutch rock band from The Hague, the Netherlands, formed in 1967. Their biggest hit, “Venus”, went to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in February 1970, and the band had sold 13.5 million discs by 1973, but the group disbanded in 1974.[1]

History

Shocking Blue – Venus (Original) excerpt
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Shocking Blue was founded in 1967 by Robbie van Leeuwen. The group had a minor hit in 1968 with “Lucy Brown is Back in Town”. After Mariska Veres took over the vocals, the group charted a world-wide hit with the song “Venus”, which peaked at No. 3 in the Netherlands in 1969. The song reached No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in February 1970. It subsequently sold 350,000 copies in Germany, and topped the U.S. chart for three weeks, the first song from the Netherlands to do so. It sold over one million copies there by January 1970, and received a gold record awarded by the Recording Industry Association of America. Global sales exceeded five million copies.[1] The song was based on “The Banjo Song” (1963) by The Big Three.

Other hits include “Send Me a Postcard” in 1968/69 and “Long and Lonesome Road” (often mistakenly named as “Long Lonesome Road”) in 1969. Shocking Blue’s songs also received quite a large amount of radio airplay on Dutch channels.[2][3]

“Venus” was followed by “Mighty Joe” (flip-side “Wild Wind”) in 1969 and “Never Marry a Railroad Man” (flip-side “Roll Engine Roll”) in 1970, which both sold over a million records.[1] Later songs – including “Hello Darkness” (1970), “Shocking You”, “Blossom Lady” and “Out of Sight, Out of Mind” (1971), “Inkpot”, “Rock in the Sea” and “Eve and the Apple” (1972) and “Oh Lord” (1973) were successful in Europe, Latin America and Asia, but failed to chart in the U.S..

In 1974 Mariska Veres left the group to start a solo career until 1982. Her singles “Take Me High” (1975) and “Lovin’ You” (1976) were mainly popular in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. Other known singles were “Tell It Like It Is” (1975), Dusty Springfield’s “Little By Little” (1976), and “Too Young” (1978). Most of these songs today are rare.

Shocking Blue made a comeback in 1979, and recorded “Louise” as their first single since their breakup back in 1974. However, the song was never released for unknown reasons. They did however, perform live with their earliest songs such as “Venus” and “Never Marry a Railroad Man” in 1980. They made another comeback in 1984, and later recorded “Jury and the Judge” with “I Am Hanging on to Love” on B-side, and yet another unreleased song “Time Is a Jetplane” in 1986.

Nirvana covered the Shocking Blue song “Love Buzz” as their debut single in 1988, and it also appeared on their 1989 album Bleach.

Mariska Veres died of cancer on 2 December 2006.
Members

The initial line-up consisted of

Robbie van Leeuwen (guitar, sitar and backing vocals) (1967-1973)
Fred de Wilde (vocals, 1967–1968)
Klaasje van der Wal (bass guitar, 1967–1972)
Cor van Beek (drums) (1967-1974)

Later members were

Mariska Veres (vocals, 1968–1974)
Leo van de Ketterij (guitar, 1970–1971)
Martin van Wijk (guitar, 1973–1974)
Henk Smitskamp (bass guitar, 1972–1974)

Discography
Albums

1968 Shocking Blue (Polydor) also known as “Beat With Us” (German title)
1969 At Home (Pink Elephant)
1970 Scorpio’s Dance (Pink Elephant) also known as “Sally Was A Good Old Girl” (Japanese title)
1971 Third Album (AKA Shocking You, Pink Elephant)
1972 Inkpot (Pink Elephant) – The official music of Mark Six
1972 Live in Japan (Pink Elephant)
1972 Attila (Pink Elephant) also known as “Rock In The Sea” (Japanese title)
1972 Eve and the Apple (Same as “Attila” with one different track, Polydor)
1973 Dream on Dreamer (Polydor)
1973 Ham (Same as “Dream On Dreamer”, but with 3 different songs and 6 alternate versions, Pink Elephant)
1974 Good Times (Pink Elephant)

Singles

1967 “Love is in The Air” / “What You Gonna Do” (Polydor)
1968 “Lucy Brown is Back in Town” / “Fix Your Hair Darling” (Pink Elephant)
1968 “Send Me a Postcard” / “Harley Davidson” (Metronome)
1969 “Long and Lonesome Road” / “Fireball of Love” (Metronome)
1969 “Venus” / “Hot Sand” (Pink Elephant)
1969 “Mighty Joe” / “Wild Wind” (Metronome)
1969 “Scorpio’s Dance” / “Sally Was a Good Old Girl” (promo)
1970 “Never Marry a Railroad Man” / “Roll Engine Roll” (Metronome)
1970 “Hello Darkness” / “Pickin’ Tomatoes” (Metronome)
1971 “Shocking You” / “Waterloo” (Metronome)
1971 “Serenade” / “Sleepless at Midnight” (Buddah)
1971 “Blossom Lady” / “Is This a Dream” (Polydor)
1971 “Out of Sight, Out of Mind” / “I Like You” (Polydor)
1972 “Inkpot” / “Give My Love to The Sunrise” (Polydor)
1972 “Rock in the Sea” / “Broken Heart” (Polydor)
1972 “Eve and the Apple” / “When I was a Girl” (Polydor)
1973 “Let Me Carry Your Bag” / “I Saw You in June” (Polydor)
1973 “Oh Lord” / “In My Time of Dying” (Polydor)
1974 “This America” / “I Won’t be Lonely Long” (Polydor)
1974 “Dream on Dreamer” / “Where The Pick-Nick Was” (Polydor)
1974 “Good Times” / “Come My Way” (Pink Elephant)
1975 “Gonna Sing My Song” / “Get It On” (Decca)
1980 “Louise” / “Venus” (promo)
1986 “The Jury and The Judge” / “I am Hanging on to Love (Polydor)
1994 “Body and Soul” / “Angel” (Red Bullet)

Compilations

LPs

1969 Sensational Shocking Blue (Discofoon)
1971 Hello Darkness (Pink Elephant)
1972 The Shocking Blue Perfect Collection (Polydor)
1972 The Best of Shocking Blue (Pink Elephant)
1973 Shocking Blue’s Best (Metronome)
1973 With love from… Shocking Blue (Capri)
1978 The Shocking Blue Double Deluxe (Polydor)
1980 Venus (Piccadilly)
1981 The Shocking Blue Greatest Hits (CNR)
1986 Best of Shocking Blue (CNR)
1986 Classics (21 Records)

CDs

1986 The Best of Shocking Blue (Victor)
1990 The Very Best of Shocking Blue (Red Bullet), (Arcade, 1993)
1990 Shocking Blue 20 Greatest Hits (Repertoire)
1990 Venus (Castle Communications AG)
1994 A Portrait of Shocking Blue (Castle)
1995 Shocking Blue The Golden Hits (Red Bullet)
1997 Singles A’s and B’s (Repertoire)
1997 Shocking Blue Grand Collection (A.R.O.)
1998 Shocking You (Laserlight)
2000 Shocking Blue Golden Collection 2000 (Lighthouse)
2000 All Gold Of The World Shocking Blue (Mekkophone & Castle Communications)
2004 Shocking Blue Greatest Hits (Red Bullet)

DVDs

2004 Greatest Hits Around The World (Red Bullet)

Source: Wikipidea

Hypocrisy (band)

metal band, death metal band, swedish metal band

Hypocrisy is a death metal band from Sweden. It was formed in 1990 in Ludvika, Sweden by Peter Tägtgren.

Musically, the band started off with a traditional death metal sound on their early albums, but soon turned into a melodic death metal band. Their early lyrics – written by original vocalist Masse Broberg – dealt with anti-Christian themes and Satanism. However, the band later chose to focus on themes such as the paranormal and extraterrestrials. Contrary to what some might believe, Magus didn’t leave because of a shift in lyrical content, but because of a cracked eardrum during their 1st European tour (he later went on to black metal band Dark Funeral as Emperor Magus Caligula). Their tenth album, Virus, contains themes more typical of death metal such as violence, the horrors of reality, insanity, torture, war, drug addiction, and emotional strife. Twelfth album End of Disclosure deals with conspiracy and anti-illuminati themes.

Background information
Origin Ludvika, Dalarna, Sweden
Genres Death metal
Melodic death metal
Progressive death metal
Blackened death metal
Years active 1990–present
Labels Nuclear Blast
Associated acts Immortal, Pain, Dark Funeral, Bloodbath
Website www.hypocrisy.cc
Members Peter Tägtgren
Mikael Hedlund
Reidar “Horgh” Horghagen
Past members Klas Ideberg
Masse Broberg
Jonas Österberg
Lars Szöke
Mathias Kamijo
Andreas Holma

After spending three years in Fort Lauderdale, Florida[4] in 1990, founder Peter Tägtgren returned to his homeland of Sweden, to form his own band. Hypocrisy’s early releases were noted as being well-executed death metal, but panned for not being particularly innovative. That criticism waned as the band matured, cultivating a more distinctive sound as well as employing an introspective lyrical approach. Later releases have a more atmospheric sound, with lyrical exploration of aliens and abduction experiences. Their release Virus has seen the band return to more death metal themes. Their most recent release, End Of Disclosure Sounds like (with peters own words) more Hypocrisy than ever. The theme around the album is conspiracy theories and anti-Illuminati based lyrics with an atmospheric,melodical sound.

Tägtgren’s experience as a producer may have also have led to the band’s change in musical direction, as he is more closely involved with many other bands while producing their albums.

On November 17, 2009, Hypocrisy cancelled their U.S. tour. After cancelling earlier in 2009, Hypocrisy confirmed a North American tour for 2010. Joining Hypocrisy on the “Long Time, No Death” tour were Scar Symmetry, Hate, Blackguard and Swashbuckle. From January to March 2010, they toured Germany, Eastern Europe and Scandinavia, finishing in Moscow. Their North American tour took place in May 2010.

On October 14, 2011, Hypocrisy released a DVD called Hell Over Sofia – 20 Years of Chaos and Confusion. It contains a full concert from the “Long Time, No Death” tour. The DVD also contains a one and a half hour documentary about the band.[5] On November 10, 2011, Mikael Hedlund announced writing material for a new studio album during an interview with Metal Shock Finland’s Chief Editor, Mohsen Fayyazi. Mikael tells Metal Shock Finland:
“ It’s too early to say what it’s going to sounds like, but all I can say is that it’s not gonna be any change of style. It will be a classic HYPOCRISY album without [any] compromises. We already got some material and we’re really looking forward to enter the studio again. We don’t know yet when it will [be], but hopefully after the summer 2012. Nothing is confirmed yet. We’re doing the Metalfest tour [of Europe] in May/June plus some other festivals. That’s the plans at the moment. ”

In early 2012 the band began to write new material for a follow up to A Taste of Extreme Divinity. On December 21, 2012 Hypocrisy announced that the title of the upcoming CD would be End of Disclosure.
Band members

Current members

Peter Tägtgren – vocals, guitar, synthesizer (1990–present)
Mikael Hedlund – bass (1992–present)
Reidar “Horgh” Horghagen – drums (2004–present)

Former members

Lars Szöke – drums (1990–2004)
Magnus “Masse” Broberg – vocals (1992–1993)
Jonas Österberg – guitar (1992–1995)
Andreas Holma – guitar (2000–2006)

Live members

Mathias Kamijo – guitar (1995–2000)
Klas Ideberg – guitar (2006)
Tomas Elofsson – live guitar (2010–present)

Discography
Albums

Penetralia (1992)
Osculum Obscenum (1993)
The Fourth Dimension (1994)
Abducted (1996)
The Final Chapter (1997)
Hypocrisy (1999)
Into the Abyss (2000)
Catch 22 (2002)
The Arrival (2004)
Virus (2005)
A Taste of Extreme Divinity (2009)
End of Disclosure (2013)

EPs

Pleasure of Molestation (1993)
Inferior Devoties (1994)
Maximum Abduction (1996)
Virus Radio EP (2005)
Too Drunk to Fuck (2013)

Demos

Rest in Pain (1991)
Rest in Pain (1992)

Compilations

10 Years of Chaos and Confusion (2001)
Beast of Hypocrisy (2012)

Live Releases

Hypocrisy Destroys Wacken (1999, CD)
Hell Over Sofia – 20 Years of Chaos and Confusion (2011, DVD)

Singles

“Carved Up” (1996)
“Don’t Judge Me” (2008)
“Eraser (Live)” (2011)
“End of Disclosure” (2013)

Source: Wikipidea

Narayan Gopal Guruwacharya

Nepali music, classical music, narayan gopal, swor samrat, guruwacharya

Narayan Gopal Gurubacharya (Nepali: नारायण गोपाल गुरूवाचार्य) (October 4, 1939 – December 5, 1990) is the most prominent and popular singer and composer in the history of Nepali music. He is popularly referred to as “Swar Samrat” (Nepali: स्वर सम्राट, meaning: Emperor of Voice) in Nepali music. He is also known as “Tragedy King.” He is well known as a singer as well as a composer. His voice range allowed him to sing songs of every genre of Nepali music. His songs are often richly orchestrated with the sitar, harmonium and flute. He belongs to the first generation of Nepali singers who took singing as a profession. His songs have also been used in movies and dramas.

Born October 4, 1939
Kathmandu, Nepal
Died December 5, 1990 (aged 51)
Kathmandu, Nepal
Spouse Pamela Lama Guruvbhacharya
First Song Panchi ko pankha ma dharti ko diyo
Last Song Birahi Maya Adhuro Rahyo
Cause of death
Diabetes
Occupation Singer, Musician, Playwriter, Editor

 

Personal life

Narayan Gopal Gurubacharya was born into a Newar family in Kilagal Tole, Kathmandu, on October 4, 1939 (18 Asoj, 1996 B.S.) to father Ram Gopal Gurubacharya and mother Asha Devi Gurubacharya. He had five brothers and six sisters. He completed his School Leaving Certificate (SLC) exams in 2016 B.S. and obtained Bachelor of Art degree in Humanities from Tri-Chandra College. Later he also went to Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda to study classical Indian music, but returned without completing his studies. He married Pemala Lama in 1971 (Falgun 2027 B.S.). Later he joined the Rastriya Naach Ghar (National Dance Theater) and rose to the post of manager (hakim). He also worked as the editor of a musical journal Bageena (बागीना) for its first three issues around 2028 B.S. He became the managing director of Sanskritik Sangsthan (Cultural Center) from 2036-05-10 to 2040-10-04 B.S.; became adviser to the Ministry of Communication from 2046-04-16 on wards; and an associate professor in Lalit Kala Campus. He also wrote a musical drama titled Kanchi Masyang (कान्छी मस्याङ).

Personality

People who knew him during his lifetime recount some of his personality: He had a considerable knowledge of history. He was an enthusiastic photographer; and he loved to watch football; he was a good chess player. In the kitchen, he was a good cook. Apart from singing, he liked to spend considerable effort in organizing various events. In his editorship, the first editions of Bageena (बागीना) magazine was issued.

Early career

The potential of his vocal talent was first recognized by his friend Manik Ratna Sthapit. Manik Ratna, who used to live in the neighboring Pyukha Tole, and Prem Dhoj Pradhan, who used to live in Bheda Singh Tole used to get together and do vocal practices using Hindi songs. But Narayan Gopal, however, would joke around by changing the words of the songs that they used to sing. Prem Dhoj and Manik Ratna recounts that he used to change the Hindi words into Nepali, thus damaging the melody of the songs to comical effect. Manik Ratna’s household was like a kind of a music school since his uncle, Siddhi Ratna Sthapit, was an expert instrumentalist. In BS 2016, after completion of his SLC exams, Prem Dhoj Pradhan took him to Radio Nepal to take a voice test. He sang “Panchi ko pankha ma dharti ko diyo,” written by Dr. Ram Man Trishit and composed by Prem Dhoj Pradhan himself. He passed the voice test on his first trial. Narayan Gopal’s first public musical performance was during the 40th anniversary of Tri Chandra College, which he agreed on to do at the request of his friends. During the performance, he acted as the tabala player.

In his own household, Narayan’s father, Asha Gopal Gurubacharya, was a strict classical musician. His father did not allow any modern music, except for classical music, to be entertained in his house. Ustad Asha Gopal considered modern music as shallow and vulgar. It was in order to appease his father that he went to India to take up lessons in classical music in Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda. But due to ill adjustment, he dropped out from the University after only four and half months.

First successes

By that time Prem-Manik duo had started to sing their own compositions. Following suit, Narayan Gopal composed six original songs written by the contemporary poet Ratna Shumsher Thapa. In that collection four of the songs were for solo vocal (स्वर्गकी रानी, आँखाको भाखा आँखैले, भो भो मलाई नछेक, मधुमासमा यो दिल) and two were for duet (बिछोडको पीडा र ए कान्छा ठट्टैमा यो बैंश जानलाग्यो). All these songs were eventually recorded in Kolkata, India, while he was in that country for his studies. These songs started to attract attention within Nepal and India, and in short time he became recognized as a major Nepali singer.

Nepal at the time had recently been liberated from Rana rule. Midst these wave of social and political changes, Narayan Gopal was able to lend his voice to songs related to love, life, hope, and patriotism. While the East-West highway was under construction, he recorded ‘जाग, जाग चम्क हे नौजवान हो,’ whereas in the fervor of patriotism ‘आमा ! तिमीलाई जलभरिका औंलाहरुले चुम्न’. Such songs made him popular among the youths of Nepal. His songs further evolved as he became more selective of songs with right combination of words, music, and emotions. Along with his contemporaries such as Pushpa Nepali, Bacchu Kailash, Tara Devi, Amber Gurung, Prem Dhoj Pradhan, Nati Kaji, Shiva Sankar, he added a new dimension to the modern Nepali music. To broaden his style, he started to hold discussions with his admirers, his competitors, and his critics. It was in this process of development that he visited Darjeeling, India, during the March 1965. The visit was fruitful for two reasons: there he met his long-time fan and future wife, Pemala Lama, with whom he fell in love; and it was there that he met another young, struggling musician Gopal Yonzon, with whom he formed a close friendship as mitjyus, in part because both had Gopal as their names.
Partnership with Gopal Yonzon

With the partnership of Gopal Yonzon during the later sixties, Narayan Gopal’s music entered a new phase of development. In the words of Ishwar Bhallav, Narayan Gopal became the singer of the hearts of the Nepali people. It was in this phase that he started to sing his famous songs of love, loss, and tragedy; and he emerged as the most prominent singer of this era. At this time, the musicians of Nepal were starting to become more self conscious and were seeking to express themselves in original emotions and style. Originality was becoming increasingly important. It was also at this time that new sounds from the West, such as by the Beatles and Bob Dylan, were entering and influencing the music of Nepal. In order to confront the influence of Western pop music, a new consciousness and a new style of music was felt to be necessary. To meet these challenges, Narayan Gopal in partnership with Gopal Yonzon created songs that have since been ever popular in Nepal. Song like बिर्सेर फेरि मलाई नहेर, चिनारी हाम्रो धेरै पुरानो, तिम्रो जस्तो मुटु मेरो पनि, लौ सुन म भन्छु मेरो रामकहानी not only gave new lease of life to Gopal Yonzon’s musical career, but it also carved a special niche for Narayan Gopal among the listeners of Nepali music.

Soon he found himself to be sought after by all the major composers of Nepal. He collaborated with established composers like Nati Kaji, Shiva Sankar, Amber Gurung, and Dharmaraj Thapa. He was starting to be known as the singer of intellect.

During the beginning of the seventies, he married his long-time fan Pemala at the age of thirty-one. After their marriage his residence shifted for sometime to Pokhara and later for sometime to Hetauda. In Pokhara, he became acquainted with the poet Bhupi Sherchan, while in Hetauda he became acquainted with fellow songwriter and composer Bhim Birag. As a result of the interactions, he composed and sang Bhupi Sherchan’s सानै हुरीमा बैँसको सपना and अल्झेछ क्यारे पछ्यौरी तिम्रो चियाको बुट्टामा; and he sang Bhim Birag’s तिमीले पनि मजस्तै माया दिएर हेर.

Later career

After his short stay in Hetauda, Narayan Gopal returned to Kathmandu and managed to find a job in Rastriya Naach Ghar (National Dance Theater) with the help of his friends Manik Ratna and Janardan Sama. He had entered Naach Ghar as a mere instrumentalist, but he slowly rose to the post of a hakim (rector). While he was in Naach Ghar, he lost many of his friends or abandoned many of his previous collaborators. After he became the hakim of Naach Ghar, he was no longer in speaking terms with his early mentor Manik Ratna. Similarly, the relationship with his childhood friend Prem Dhoj became distant. After the marriage of his mitjyu Gopal Yonzon, the relationship between the two also dampened. Among the reasons for this was his fame, success, and growing arrogance.

At this stage of his life, he found himself confronting a new generation of Nepali youths. Among the young musical talents of that time, his partnership with Dibya Khaling took off; and he started lending his voice to Khalings compositions, thus initiating another phase of his singing career. Songs like सँधै नै म हाँसे तिमीलाई रुवाई, मायाको आधारमा सम्झौता नै हुन्छ, बिपना नभइ helped to revive his popularity. During this stage he started to collaborate with new breed of songwriters such as Khyetra Pratap Adhikari, Kali Prasad Rijal, Norden Rumba, Dinesh Adhikari, and Bishwambhar Pyaukurel, while his relationship with his old collaborators was neglected. Among the composers of the new generation, he collaborated with the likes of Sambhujit Baskota, Bhupendra Rayamajhi, and Shubha Bahadur. In his late stage of career, he lent his considerable prestige to launch the career of many upcoming musicians. As such, he was willing to compromise his artistry and sing weak songs by new composers and songwriters. He also sang in film songs.

In total his career spanned twenty-eight years, during which he sang in eighteen movies and recorded a hundred and fifty-seven songs.
Death

Narayan Gopal suffered from diabetes, yet had a propensity for sweetmeats. This habit led to his demise in December 5, 1990 (19 Mangsir, 2047 B.S.) in Bir Hospital, at 9 p.m. in Kathmandu, at the age of fifty-one. He had no children. He has four brothers and three sisters.

Musical Style

To Narayan Gopal, the most important part in the art of modern songs were: melody, lyrics, and the singer. This did not rule out other aspects, however. Chords, he said, are required to put life in the music, but the chord progression is part of the arrangement, not something to base the composition of the melody on. When the melody is composed, the arranger will make the progression from the melody. Without a good arrangement, Narayan Gopal said, a song will be like a vegetable dish without salt or other spices.

The aspects of this recipe at work included nonrepetitive melodies moving over the accompaniment in short, repeated rhythmic figures; heterophony, countermelodies, chords, and harmonic progressions; one melody for refrain, another for the verse, and then — as part of the arrangement — melodies for the instrumental interludes marking off the sung sections.

Awards and recognitions

Narayan Gopal was awarded several national honours which include (all dates in Bikram Sambat):

Best Composition (Radio Nepal) – 2023 B.S.
Best Singer (Radio Nepal) – 2024 B.S.
Ratna Record Award – 2039 B.S.
Gorkha Dakshin Bahu, Fourth – 2033 B.S.
Indra Rajya Laxmi Award – 2040 B.S.
Chhinalata Award – 2044 B.S.
Jagadamba Shree – 2045 B.S.
Urbashi Rang Award – 2047 B.S.
Trishakti Patta, Third – 2048 B.S. (posthumously)
Narayan gopal singing award-1969

Biography in other media

A short biography (available at first, second, and third) has been made as a tribute to Narayan Gopal.
Discography

Geeti Sradhanjali Vol 1-4 (2049-03-02)
Swarneem Sandhya Vol 1-2
Preyasi Ka Yaad Haru (2054-02-16)
Prem Ko Mala
Manche Ko Maya
Malai Nasodha
Lali Gurash Bhayechu
Aljhe Cha Kyare
Timro Mann Ma
Geeti Yatra Vol 1 (2044-10-10)
Narayan Gopal Ka Aadhunik Geet Haru Vol 1-9
Malati Mangale (a musical drama)

Joe Satarani

Awards and nominations

Nominations

Satriani has the second most Grammy Award nominations (15, after Brian McKnight), of any artist without winning. See further artists.

Year Album Category
1989 “Always With Me, Always With You” Best Pop Instrumental Performance
Surfing with the Alien Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1990 “The Crush of Love” Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1991 Flying in a Blue Dream Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1993 The Extremist Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1994 “Speed of Light Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1995 “All Alone” Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1997 “(You’re) My World” Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1998 “Summer Song” (Live) Best Rock Instrumental Performance
1999 “A Train of Angels” Best Rock Instrumental Performance
2001 “Until We Say Goodbye” Best Rock Instrumental Performance
2002 “Always With Me, Always With You” (Live) Best Rock Instrumental Performance from Live in San Francisco
2003 “Starry Night” Best Rock Instrumental Performance
2006 Super Colossal Best Rock Instrumental Performance
2008 “Always With Me, Always With You” (Live) Best Rock Instrumental Performance from Satriani Live!

Source: WIKIPEDIA

Steven Siro Vai

Best guitarist, steve vai, joe satarani, fastest guitarist,
Birth name Steven Siro Vai
Born June 6, 1960 (age 53)
arle Place, Long Island, New York, United States
Genres Instrumental rock,hard rock,heavy metal,progressive rock, progressive metal, experimental rock, speed metal
Instruments keyboards, vocals
Years active 1978–present
Labels Favored Nations, Relativity, Urantia Records, Akashic Records,Epic
Associated acts Joe Satriani, Frank Zappa, Alcatrazz,David Lee Roth,Whitesnake,Meat Loaf, Zappa plays Zappa, Devin Townsend, Billy Sheehan, G3,Iwrestledabearonce
Website www.vai.com
Notable instruments
Ibanez JEM
Ibanez Universe

Nepali Singer Navras Shrestha

Nepali singer, navras, Best Singer ever, best guitarist, best designe, top guitarist of nepal, world top handsome,nepal top guitarists, nepali top camera man, founder of lakhey band, founder of The Lakhey band, founder of best metal band, Newa The King, Navras N students

Navras Shrestha (Rajopadhayaya) (born September 30, 1988) is the main songwriter, founder, lead vocalist, Lead guitarist and lyricist for the Nepal first Newari heavy metal band “The Lakhey”.

Navras Shrestha founded The Lakhey in 2004. THe Lakhey first recorded song “Dhampa Tacha” originally sung and written by “Bikash Shrestha” is one of first and best Newari Metal song.

Birth name Navras Shrestha
Born 2044-06-14
Genres Metal, Rock, Newari Metal
Occupations Musician, Web Developer, singer-songwriter, Director, Photographer, Script writer
Instruments Guitar, vocals,Bass, Didgeridoo, Dimey(Newars Drum)
Years active 2006-Present
Associated acts The Lakhey, Newa The King, Navras ‘N’ Students
Website www.navras.com.np, thelakhey.com.np

 

Early life

Navras Shrestha (Rajopadhayaya) (born September 30, 1988) is the main songwriter, founder, lead vocalist, Lead guitarist and lyricist for the Nepal first Newari heavy metal band “The Lakhey”.

Navras Shrestha founded The Lakhey in 2004. THe Lakhey first recorded song “Dhampa Tacha” originally sung and written by “Bikash Shrestha” is one of first and best Newari Metal song.

Malshree Dhun by Navras Shrestha

Happy dashain 2072 to all

Posted by Juju Navras Shrestha on Saturday, October 17, 2015

Early life

Navras Shrestha was born in Kathmandu, Nepal, son of Saraswoti Shrestha Dress Designer and Raj Bhakta Shrestha Teacher of Nepal’s first School Durbar High School. He Has two older sister and one older brother.
Musical influences

Shrestha was sixteen years old when he first began vocal lessons and finally, at the age of eighteen, he began to play guitar.

Shrestha identifies Nirvana as having been his main musical influence as a child,and has said they were the reason he wanted to play guitar and formed band. He has also cited Narayan Gopal, Arun Thapa, Phatteman Rajbhandari, Aruna Lama, Megadeth, Motörhead, Iron Maiden, Thin Lizzy, Scorpions, steve vai and Zakk Wylde as important influences.

Songs

First Newa Metal Song Dhampa tacha

Jeewan By Navras Shrestha

Videos

First Newari Metal Song – Dhamapa Tacha

Sweating Bullet Lead Cover

Photography

Fashion Photography
Female Photography


Male Photography


Religious Event Photography